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seen May 31 at 20:41

Jul
2
comment Indicative form of an i-adjective used adverbially
Yep, there are lots in English. "Damned straight," "heaps hard" (is this one Australia-specific?). "Hella", arguably. Japanese has other words like ちょう with similar flexibility (ちょう暑い, ちょう行く, etc.) which is why I think it's a general process of words being ground down to non-inflecting intensifiers, rather than something specific to -i adjectives as such.
Jul
2
answered Indicative form of an i-adjective used adverbially
Jun
22
comment What are the rules for substituting の with ん?
@taylor As sawa says, にて→で (evolution of the particle で) is a historical change; it is very well attested, but it is fully lexicalized by now -- I don't believe that にて is an "underlying phonetic form" of で in any meaningful sense in contemporary Japanese. So the environment is "everywhere that で is/was used", but the place to look is not contemporary Japanese phonology -- you have to go way back. "A History of the Japanese Language" (Frellesvig 2010) covers this issue and several related ones very well.
Jun
21
comment ないで vs なくて How to correlate two or more phrases with negative verbs
+1 for bibliography
Jun
21
comment Why is the Japanese currency pronounced “yen” in English?
@sawa Sure, as I said I agree that there are reasons for the ¥ symbol (actually I find these issues around the edges of writing systems very interesting and worthwhile). I just don't think that the issue is so clear-cut that any question about it must be the result of cultural bias. (But, in point of fact, the questioner does not seem upset by what you said, so this conversation is really just you and me debating for fun... we'd better cut it out, or start a new + more specific question perhaps.)
Jun
20
comment Why is the Japanese currency pronounced “yen” in English?
@sawa My first point is more about writing + clutter than reading. "$2" is much more concise and faster to write than "2 dollars", but "¥2" doesn't seem to have the same advantages over "2円" (or "二円"). I understand that there are good reasons to have a ¥ symbol as well as the 円 character in usage, I just think that, because the two cases aren't exactly the same, failure to intuit those reasons doesn't have to be due to cultural bias. It is a bit subjective, I guess, but in this case I feel like OP deserved the benefit of the doubt.
Jun
20
comment Why is the Japanese currency pronounced “yen” in English?
"Why is '$' is used instead of writing 'dollar'?" Because it is an abbreviation. But ¥ is not an abbreviation of 円 in any meaningful sense (both are just one character long). It was clearly invented by analogy with $, but why bother when 円 (or 圓) already existed? This is a reasonable question (not really about "Japanese", admittedly). Furthermore, since ¥ was clearly modelled on Western usage, and we say "yen" in English for no obvious reason, it does not seem prima facie unreasonable to wonder whether ¥ is pronounced /yen/ in Japanese too, distinct from 円 /en/.
Jun
19
awarded  Civic Duty
Jun
14
comment What do you call these words?
Right, I'm not sure that "onomatopoeia" is the right word either. But I think the shared morphophonemic characteristics (gemination, ending in -ri, possibly relatable to onomatopoeic or otherwise mimetic roots?) are what is of interest, not the fact that they are adverbs.
Jun
14
comment What do you call these words?
I think Chris is looking for a word like "onomatopoeia" or "psychomimesis" rather than asking what part of speech they are.
Jun
8
reviewed Approve suggested edit on What exactly is 我, and how is it used?
Jun
1
comment What is the te-form of 問う?
I'd just like to note that "this unusual conjunction came about" is a bit misleading; this is a perfectly normal conjunction in much of (modern) Western Japan, and you can trace the split back to how the onbin changes worked out in medieval times. The question is really why the premodern/western-dialect form was retained/adopted as an irregular form in what eventually became Standard Japanese for just a few verbs (問う, 乞う, etc.)
May
31
comment Why are there two words 算数 and 数学 representing different fields?
I like this answer, but I think there is a historical component too. IIRC 算数 was taught in terakoya schools and considered a practical skill useful for business, etc.; 数学 comes from a more "academic" tradition, and was the vessel into which Western mathematics was eventually poured. But I haven't had time to look up proper references.
May
29
comment Why do TV subtitles use spaces (instead of commas)?
Incidentally, I do not know if Pacerier's subtitles were actually added by the producer, but I can vouch for having seen similar orthography watching live Japanese TV with the subtitles on. I am less confident about having seen spaces after は and so on, but I have definitely seen spaces after ねえ, あたし, etc. (basically corresponding to pauses in speech).
May
29
comment Why do TV subtitles use spaces (instead of commas)?
@TsuyoshiIto I think you might be surprised by how many Japanese TV shows have subtitles (in Japanese) these days. Look for the little 字-in-a-box symbols in a TV guide, like this one: tbs.co.jp/tv/daily/?20120529 .
May
28
comment What does ちがいます。 mean?
Actually, let me add one important caveat to that "-i adjective chigai" thing: the interesting part is that for many of these speakers whenever it would appear as "chigai", it appears as "chigau" instead. You might say that they treat "chigau" as an -i adjective that happens to have an irregular plain/dictionary form ending in -u instead of -i.
May
27
comment What does ちがいます。 mean?
@dotnetN00b There's no standard Japanese path from "chigau" to "chigakunai", but that's not what those speakers are doing. The evidence suggests that they have an -i adjective "chigai" in their lexicon. Note that people also say "chigee yo!" (like "takee yo!" for "takai yo!"), "chigakatta", etc. One reason for this reanalysis might be the fact that, in this usage, the (original) verb "chigau" is more stative than dynamic -- it describes how something is rather than what something does, so in some ways it's more adjective-y.
May
25
comment What does ちがいます。 mean?
ちがくない is perfectly grammatical in the idiolects of the people who (non-ironically) use it... it's just not standard.
May
24
comment Kanji 何: why is it missing in 今なにしてる (facebook text in status editbox)?
Good point. Another possible reason for 誰 in hiragana in some contexts is that (incredibly) it wasn't on the Joyo Kanji list until 2010.
May
24
comment Kanji 何: why is it missing in 今なにしてる (facebook text in status editbox)?
Re the second point, note that it is fairly common to write "今、何してる" but less common (still not unheard of) to write "今、なにしてる". I have always understood this sort of thing as being due to vague aversion to "writing two kanji letters in a row when they do not form one word", as Tsuyoshi explains. Inserting a comma between them is another way of keeping them from running together.