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seen Mar 6 at 14:33

Jul
26
comment What's the literal and natural translation of たるもの?
How far back? Late Old Japanese, I suppose, but why does it matter? Nor will I argue that たる was a copula in older forms of Japanese; I just wanted to point out that (1) たる is not an ancestor of である, (2) たる can have a slightly different implication from である (such as prescriptiveness), and (3) knowing that たる comes from とある can help make that difference clearer. It's not that "whoever is a child" is wrong, it's more that it doesn't add any information that "children" doesn't. (I will change my comment to clarify this a bit.)
Jul
25
comment What's the literal and natural translation of たるもの?
Whoops, I meant to add this as a comment. Sorry.
Jul
25
answered What's the literal and natural translation of たるもの?
Jul
23
answered Is there a specific term that refers to female sword fighting?
Jul
22
comment Do any of the Japanese particles have different pronunciations in any dialects? Or extra or missing particles?
sawa: Yes, I agree with you entirely. That is my point, although obviously explained unclearly (sorry). It's not that there are no ancestor-descendant relationships among Japanese dialects. As you say, they appear to have originated from central Japan and traveled outwards in waves. All I mean is that linguistically speaking, it's not the case that Tohoku dialect (for example) is an altered form of standard Japanese (= codified Yamanote Edo dialect). They diverged from a common source and developed alongside each other.
Jul
22
answered Do any of the Japanese particles have different pronunciations in any dialects? Or extra or missing particles?
Jul
22
revised Where's the missing い in ありがた迷惑【ありがた めいわく】?
Edited again for more clarity. Once more.
Jul
22
comment Where's the missing い in ありがた迷惑【ありがた めいわく】?
Okay, I edited it a bit to put the meat up-front. I'm not willing to take out the technical words like "lexicalize" altogether, since there are people who find them as useful as you find them off-putting, but I think I added enough context around them to make it pretty clear what they mean even if you haven't encountered them before.
Jul
22
revised Where's the missing い in ありがた迷惑【ありがた めいわく】?
Edited again for more clarity. Once more.
Jul
22
awarded  Editor
Jul
22
revised Where's the missing い in ありがた迷惑【ありがた めいわく】?
Edited again for more clarity. More!
Jul
22
awarded  Supporter
Jul
22
comment Where's the missing い in ありがた迷惑【ありがた めいわく】?
Sorry, man, let me try again. ありがた迷惑 is not two words, but one: a "compound noun", i.e. a noun that can be broken down into distinct parts -- like "sharpshooter" in English. When you use an adjective in a compound noun, you only use the stem. The stem of ありがたい is ありがた. You can see a similar pattern in words like 黒髪, 細身, 早口, etc.
Jul
22
answered Where's the missing い in ありがた迷惑【ありがた めいわく】?
Jul
21
comment Do the various verbs pronounced つく differ in intonation?
Sort of. Yes, it's the NHK 編 日本語発音アクセント辞典, but I have an edition published in 1985 with a blue-and-gray cover that claims to be a 改訂新版.
Jul
21
awarded  Teacher
Jul
21
answered Do the various verbs pronounced つく differ in intonation?