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seen May 31 at 20:41

Aug
2
comment Etymology of 土産 {みやげ}
Just some extra info on this: Sugimoto Tsutomu 杉本つとむ's Gogenkai 語源海 says that both /miage/ and /miyage/ are seen in old writings, but /miage/ appears to be older. If this is true, the /miya/ in /miyage/ is very unlikely to come from /miyako/ 都 or /miya/ 宮. . For the record, Sugimoto agrees with the 見上げ etymology, and so does the Kojien 広辞苑 dictionary.
Aug
2
revised Etymology of 土産 {みやげ}
Added link to gogen-allguide
Aug
2
suggested suggested edit on Etymology of 土産 {みやげ}
Jul
31
comment Difference between AにB and AはB
I think you are right, yibe -- you should add this explanation as an answer, not a comment, so folks can vote on it.
Jul
30
answered How would one convey the concept of “vouching” in Japanese?
Jul
30
revised Does the Japanese language only have negative terms for flirting?
Added final note
Jul
30
answered Does the Japanese language only have negative terms for flirting?
Jul
29
comment “Unsolvable problem”
But you can say 割れにくい, and that is instantaneous. Perhaps 〜eにくい has some sort of restriction relating to concrete vs abstract subjects?
Jul
28
awarded  Commentator
Jul
28
comment How to end a sentence in わけ
Yes, I know that だ-dropping is common in informal speech, but I am talking about a separate phenomenon, one where わけ is used almost as a sentence-final particle and actually can't be combined with だ without changing in nuance. But I accept that the line between this and a だ-dropped わけだ is very iffy and calls for better evidence than my "it seems to me", so, peace. (Re interpretation of the question, quite true! My assumption is based on the "just about anything you say" part of the question specifically; this struck me as a reference to the semantically bleached わけ I mention above.)
Jul
28
comment How to end a sentence in わけ
Derek, this is a great summary of the paper and will no doubt be helpful to people looking for info on わけ in general, but my interpretation of the question was that language hacker was asking about the common colloquial use of "category 5" in particular, where わけ appears like a sentence-final particle [specifically NOT followed by だ] affecting implication/discourse structure more than meaning. Maybe it would be nice to throw a note at the top covering that specific colloquial usage before diving in to the full story?
Jul
27
comment How to end a sentence in わけ
Might it be better to view the わけ in this case as having a meaning closer to English "circumstances" than "reason"? e.g. 彼がそこのいたわけ = "(The circumstances were that) he was there" The meaning (he was there) is the same, but the implication as a speech act is different. (Here I tend to agree with your explanation that it used as an intermediate step in an explanation; you are not just observing that he was there, but setting the scene in which his being there has bearing on what is to happen next.)
Jul
26
answered Do people actually ever say みょうにち?
Jul
26
revised What's the literal and natural translation of たるもの?
Added information about suggested translation
Jul
26
comment What's the literal and natural translation of たるもの?
Sorry, "late Old Japanese" is unclear, isn't it? I meant the late stage of Old Japanese (pre-Heian), not Early Middle. Re the prescriptive implication, sure, that is one way of putting it; I will add it to the answer, thanks. Re the quotative thing, all I can say is that there are people who find information like this useful when learning -- I am one of them.
Jul
26
revised What's the literal and natural translation of たるもの?
Updated based on sawa's feedback
Jul
26
comment What's the literal and natural translation of たるもの?
How far back? Late Old Japanese, I suppose, but why does it matter? Nor will I argue that たる was a copula in older forms of Japanese; I just wanted to point out that (1) たる is not an ancestor of である, (2) たる can have a slightly different implication from である (such as prescriptiveness), and (3) knowing that たる comes from とある can help make that difference clearer. It's not that "whoever is a child" is wrong, it's more that it doesn't add any information that "children" doesn't. (I will change my comment to clarify this a bit.)
Jul
25
comment What's the literal and natural translation of たるもの?
Whoops, I meant to add this as a comment. Sorry.
Jul
25
answered What's the literal and natural translation of たるもの?
Jul
23
answered Is there a specific term that refers to female sword fighting?