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seen Sep 30 at 11:21

Jun
29
awarded  Yearling
Jun
29
awarded  Yearling
Jul
23
comment What does やい mean?
True, but since "やい!やい!" wouldn't work as a taunt, I tend to think of やい as a distinct word from やーい, which would.
Jun
29
awarded  Yearling
Jun
12
awarded  Nice Answer
Feb
7
comment Who scolded whom in Aに怒られる?
The distinction is between scolding someone (を怒る)and getting angered by them (に怒る). So it's not necessarily a mistake to say so-and-soに怒る、it just means they angered you, rather than you scolded them. That said, it does seem more rare to use Xに怒る, rather than specifying something about them that angered you, for example Xのだらしなさに怒る (got upset at X's sloppiness).
Feb
3
comment I dont understand ~ような in this context
立ち止まる時間などない has a similar effect to 立ち止まるような時間はない, but with a different nuance. When you add など to a negative statement, you're indicating that the statement you're negating is silly. Sort of like "We don't have time to stop" vs "of course we don't have time to stop". Other examples: おばけなどいない = of course there are no ghosts. お前の人形に興味などはない = of course I'm not interested in your dolls (など modifies 興味/interest, indicating that it's ridiculous to assume interest). おまえの人形などに興味はない = I don't care about your silly dolls (here など modifies 人形/doll), making it the direct subject of ridicule.
Feb
3
comment I dont understand ~ような in this context
Hmm, I had to downvote this, since ような here modifies 時間 (time), not 立ち止まる (stopping). You translate the phrase as "we don't have time for stopping, or the like" (i.e. stopping, or other such activities), whereas what's being said is "we don't have the kind of time needed for stopping" (see Hyperworm's answer).
Feb
3
comment I dont understand ~ような in this context
Perfect answer! 様な is best thought of as having two different English translations, depending on context. "In the manner of", and "that sort of". For example: 蟹の様な歩き方だ = walks like a crab. 家を買うような貯金は持ってない = don't have the sort of money needed to buy a house.
Feb
3
revised Who scolded whom in Aに怒られる?
added 23 characters in body
Feb
3
comment Who scolded whom in Aに怒られる?
@dainichi nope. Example: 彼は生徒の態度に怒った = he got angry at the student's attitude. 彼は生徒を怒った = he scolded the student.
Oct
30
comment are the usage of うるさい to mean “fussy” and the usage of 草 to mean “substandard” archaic?
@Muhd: yes, that's correct, and yes, in the example the singular/plural of shop/店 is ambiguous. It could go either way between "he knows a good ramen shop" and "he knows good ramen shops".
Aug
2
comment The difference between くらい and ほど in hyperbole
ほど and くらい can indeed be interchangeable, though your mileage will vary depending on the particular phrase. The difference is between "measuring up to" and "about equal to", which is as subtle a nuance in Japanese as it is in English.
Aug
2
answered The difference between くらい and ほど in hyperbole
Aug
1
comment Are there any Japanese words as versatile as “fuck” in English?
ちょう / 超 works. It literally and figuratively translates as "super" as in 超疲れた = super-tired, 超面白かった = super-fun, etc.
Aug
1
comment Are there any Japanese words as versatile as “fuck” in English?
@Nicolas Raoul: It's short for 真面目, or "seriously". You might say that because it isn't actually rude, you can use it in more places than "fuck". It's still highly informal though.
Aug
1
revised How to get clarification in Japanese
fixed grammar
Jul
31
answered How to get clarification in Japanese
Jul
18
revised Fun with synonyms - “flattery"
added 86 characters in body
Jul
18
answered Fun with synonyms - “flattery"