2,709 reputation
1323
bio website
location Sapporo-shi, Japan
age 33
visits member for 1 year, 5 months
seen 10 hours ago

I have a doctorate in philosophy from Fordham University.

I worked for 10 years as a web application developer writing code in PHP (generally object-oriented) and working with MySQL (moderately normalized database design) to deliver HTML/JS/CSS. I used to answer questions on Experts Exchange and had a reputation of 825,192 there before I became disappointed with their model (mostly PHP and MySQL questions).

I presently work at a University in Japan as a 特任講師.


2d
comment Could you help me translate this sentence into english?
@oldergod I don't mean to say it should be ... I mean to say that if you're going to stick a kanji on it which would be wrong that it would be better to err with 者 than 物. (Am I still wrong in the limited sense I intended?)
2d
comment Could you help me translate this sentence into english?
You sure that's the right 漢字 to use there. Wouldn't [者]{もの} be preferable?
Mar
22
reviewed Excellent What's the difference between 水 and 湯
Mar
22
reviewed Excellent 自意識過剰 - what does it mean, exactly?
Mar
22
reviewed Excellent Use of 「~ておりますしょうか。 」
Mar
22
reviewed Excellent いい人そう。using “seemingly” そう with nouns?
Mar
22
revised What word describes the concept of worldwide time zones?
英語を直している。複数・単数注意。自然表現へ変えた。
Mar
19
revised と particle usage - am I understanding it correctly?
trying to avoid a confusing use of cause and effect.
Mar
18
comment 独{ひと}り善{よ}がりの考え - what does it mean?
"Word meaning" is not really a motivation. I at least encounter several thousand Japanese words each day, but I don't bother asking each as a question here. What specifically motivates wanting to know what this word means, i.e., where you saw this word.
Mar
18
comment 独{ひと}り善{よ}がりの考え - what does it mean?
Based on the corpus, I would say the closest translation would be either solipsistic or narcissistic. I would also it doesn't look like a very common word...
Mar
18
comment 独{ひと}り善{よ}がりの考え - what does it mean?
I'm deleting my answer. It might be easier for someone to answer if you (a) explain what motivates the question [did you get an e-mail that has this word in it? are you reading a novel that contains it? are you just mining the dictionary for something you want to write yourself?] and (b) indicated the nuances you think a particular set of words has rather than just this one ... Separately, you can consult a corpus for Japanese if you want to see how it is used: kotonoha.gr.jp/shonagon
Mar
17
comment Can anyone help translate this Kanji?
It's this character 然. It means nature or spontaneity.
Mar
16
comment Using the Nelson index# as a means to order kanji? What do natives use?
@AHelps - English is more complicated than you're letting on there. Telephone book sort order and dictionary sort order ... e.g., en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mac_and_Mc_together / also the issue of spaces.
Mar
16
comment 名詞+のない?名詞+がない?Which one is better here?
It's called の-が conversion...
Mar
16
comment 名詞+のない?名詞+がない?Which one is better here?
possible duplicate of How does the の work in 「日本人の知らない日本語」?
Mar
13
comment How many Jōyō Kanji are identical to simplified Hanzi?
I don't know simplified Hanzi, but to give an example look here: moji.tekkai.com/zoom/%E7%B6%9A/page.html . The 教科書体 and the 楷書体 would be "identical" under (a) but not (b), (c), and (d). Stoke order seems to differ widely between languages and users for 必 (so we get some (a) and (c) and (d)). 判 is written with the top two strokes either like 八 or ソ -- but that would be (a), (b), and (d) in many cases. See moji.tekkai.com/zoom/%E5%88%A4/page.html
Mar
13
comment How many Jōyō Kanji are identical to simplified Hanzi?
Originally, I was thinking to upvote this, but there's a very important qualification I think the question needs. Can you tell us what you mean by "identical"? Specifically, do you mean (a) same number of strokes or (b) same strokes from a technical standpoint, (c) would look the same if written by native writers of each language, or (d) are unicode identical? or ...
Mar
13
comment Is it easier to learn Chinese after learning Japanese or vice versa?
@senshin I take the OPs question to be different than what you describe. I take it that OP wants to learn both Japanese and Chinese and is asking us whether (a) Japanese before Chinese OR (b) Chinese before Japanese is a better route. There are several complexities that make this appear to me as an opinion-bases question, viz., (1) we have to make judgments about degree of motivation, (2) we have to make judgments (I doubt there's data) on which sequence has more propaedeutic value from L2 to L3, (3) We don't even know OP's L1, (4) we don't know proposed learning strategy (classes? 独学?)
Mar
12
revised What does 兼 mean when it appears next to a person's name in an organizational chart?
edited body
Mar
12
comment What does 兼 mean when it appears next to a person's name in an organizational chart?
@l'électeur No, I'm just genuinely wrong. I had an issue earlier where my school was claiming it would be 兼業 for me to do a 講義 at a different school... Apparently, I have yet to master the usage. (But mistakes are how we learn!!!)