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seen Apr 1 '13 at 21:17

Nov
10
comment How do the two ideas in this sentence come together?
@DaveMG: Oh! Of course!
Nov
10
answered How do the two ideas in this sentence come together?
Nov
10
comment How do the two ideas in this sentence come together?
Should it read "スリー" there by any chance?
Nov
10
answered Does には in this sentence imply vagueness of the source?
Nov
8
answered What does あらいだす mean?
Nov
8
comment This instance of のに is opposite from my expectations
Actually, the second translation might be better with "invaluable" instead of "handy" but I think it makes not much of a difference. Or does it?
Nov
8
answered This instance of のに is opposite from my expectations
Nov
5
comment My friend said she says “やる時やる.” a lot. What's the translation to english?
OK, maybe not just when necessary but also with an emphasis on "well", as pointed out by Hyperworm.
Nov
5
answered My friend said she says “やる時やる.” a lot. What's the translation to english?
Nov
4
revised How can a verb be in the beginning of a sentence when it is usually at the end? Ex. 折れた淡い翼。
added 1 characters in body
Nov
4
comment How can a verb be in the beginning of a sentence when it is usually at the end? Ex. 折れた淡い翼。
@TsuyoshiIto: Thanks for pointing it out! I corrected it.
Nov
4
awarded  Teacher
Nov
4
awarded  Editor
Nov
4
revised How can a verb be in the beginning of a sentence when it is usually at the end? Ex. 折れた淡い翼。
added 222 characters in body
Nov
4
answered How can a verb be in the beginning of a sentence when it is usually at the end? Ex. 折れた淡い翼。
Jun
20
awarded  Supporter