4,412 reputation
947
bio website rintaun.tumblr.com
location Pittsburgh, PA
age 27
visits member for 3 years, 6 months
seen yesterday

I graduated from Ohio University in 2011 with a B.A. in Linguistics with a minor in Japanese. Nearly half of my time enrolled at Ohio was spent studying at Chubu University near Nagoya, Japan. I plan eventually to go to graduate school for foreign language education, to become certified to teach Japanese at the secondary level.

In the mean time, however, I program (primarily in PHP and SQL). I also recently began working as a freelance Japanese-to-English translator, though I've translated anime and manga as a hobby in the past.


Nov
30
comment の in Verb+のじゃない: Nominalizer or Explanatory?
@snailboat Oh yeah, I guess that is genitive. That's embarrassing, haha.
Nov
20
comment How to place ありました with the 〜んです pattern, and the meaning of the resulting sentence
I'm not sure "Isn't there anything?" is a very fitting translation for 「なにか なかったんですか」. Perhaps something more like "Was something not [there]?" or "Was something missing?" would be more apt.
Nov
16
comment Is 行く stative, continous or instantaneous?
+1 for awesome charts (and awesome explanation)
Nov
16
comment Difference between 隠{かく}す and 秘{ひ}める (to hide)
@istrasci Yeah, definitely related... but that question definitely doesn't answer this one.
Nov
16
comment What's the difference between 参考【さんこう】 and 参照【さんしょう】?
@virmaior I understand that's what he's saying; though I don't entirely agree, that is not at all what I was saying. Rather, my point was that listing them individually as they are with no additional explanation: a) takes up a large amount of space, while conveying relatively little information, and b) comes across as slightly condescending.
Nov
16
accepted Are 漢語 always more formal than 和語?
Nov
16
reviewed Reviewed What does 挨拶ナマ mean?
Nov
16
comment What does 挨拶ナマ mean?
Welcome to Japanese.SE! Do you think you could add some context, such as the original sentence? That tends to help quite a bit with questions like this. Thanks!
Nov
16
comment What's the difference between 参考【さんこう】 and 参照【さんしょう】?
Thank you for the very detailed answer! This is exactly what I was looking for. Although, if you are just going to say "X is not natural" with no further explanation, the answer may be even better without listing them one by one.
Nov
16
accepted What's the difference between 参考【さんこう】 and 参照【さんしょう】?
Nov
16
revised What's the difference between 参考【さんこう】 and 参照【さんしょう】?
Fix grammatical typo "then" -> "than" (how embarrassing...)
Nov
16
comment Are グラス and ガラス alternative spellings of the same word?
Are these pronounced (in 標準語【ひょうじゅんご】) as ガラス【HHL】, グラス【LHL】, and グラス【HLL】, respectively?
Nov
16
asked What's the difference between 参考【さんこう】 and 参照【さんしょう】?
Nov
15
comment What's a good word for “offer”, as in “…for offering us eternal life…”?
For things like this in the future, a bilingual Bible would likely be an invaluable resource.
Nov
15
answered When writing by hand, can kana be half-width and kanji be full-width?
Nov
15
comment の in Verb+のじゃない: Nominalizer or Explanatory?
The nominalizer の can turn into ん, though it seem to occur only in extremely limited circumstances. Specifically, in front of either 所【ところ】 or 家【うち】 (e.g. 俺【おれ】ん家【ち】, 僕【ぼく】んとこ, そこんところ)
Nov
15
comment Can you say ~てもらった when you actually did nothing?
「仕事を手伝ってもらう」 and other such constructions is a pretty good example of "getting someone to do something". With させる it might be something like 「早退させてもらう」; I don't know what the textbooks say -- "to get someone to do something" is my own approximation of that particular meaning.
Nov
14
comment Can you say ~てもらった when you actually did nothing?
@EiríkrÚtlendi I agree entirely! And yet, despite that conscious understanding, I get the strong feeling that I hear this type of thing all the time, and it does not sound wrong -- hence this question. :)
Nov
13
asked Can you say ~てもらった when you actually did nothing?
Nov
7
comment Usage of か after a clause?
You may be able to communicate even if you drop the か, but it is not grammatical to do so as far as I can tell (this may not be true in some particular dialect or another, I suppose...). The best I can think of is that if you split it into two sentences with rising intonation at the end of the first (デパートはどこにある↗ [pause] 知っていますか?) then it is, if not entirely natural, at least more or less grammatical.