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Aug
19
comment What is the difference between だらけ and ばかり
You guys are brilliant, I was just about to ask about that part of the video and you already picked it out. I think Maikeru is probably on the right track, though I say that purely on my own logic and have no way to prove it.
Aug
18
comment What is the difference between だらけ and ばかり
Perfect. Thankyou for your answer!
Jul
25
comment How do ことになる and ようになる differ? (When ことになる cannot = “It has been decided that”)
Please ensure you are fluent or very well versed in Japanese before you advise learners, particularly if you have a teaching style where you almost insult the learner by confidently telling him how weird his Japanese is, even when it is perfectly fine. If you have an idea, you can tentatively raise it so long as you first stipulate that you don't really know at all, and that you are just wanting to see if you are correct or not. Some examples of good openers that suit you: "My Japanese is not very good but I think..." "I'm only a beginner, but..." "Could someone who is good explain to me..."
Jul
25
comment How do ことになる and ようになる differ? (When ことになる cannot = “It has been decided that”)
Brilliant! I had the same feeling that that translation was overrated. I only used it as a reference point. I'm the same way with most translations and explanations of Japanese. It's not a really well dealt with language compared to other ones. I understand now though. The よう one focuses on a change from one situation to another and the こと one is only a descriptor of the final result at that point in time.
Apr
25
comment What does ~ましょう ~おうmean when you say it to no one
Ahh so I think it along the lines of my reasoning then. It shows that the information is subjective and dependent upon the speaker. It is slightly more assertive because you are connecting it with the future. Sort of like "I will go to the shops" if you acknowledge the nuance inherent in the word "will". That's what ties it to the "Considering" "Planning" etc.
Apr
11
comment Differences between それとも ・または・もしくは・あるいは
Now that's more like it!!!! Thankyou so much! I will definitely make this part of my notes!
Mar
12
comment 推量の助詞、「う」… does this particle exist?
Hey, why the downvote? TokyoNagoya that sounds intriguing, could you elaborate?
Feb
25
comment 君に話しがある How does this work?
Target particle means it is a particle which shows where the action or object or whatever is aimed at. I get what it is supposed to translate as, what I don't understand is how に is being used. It places the story with 君 because it is saying Xにある means it exists at X.
Feb
25
comment Strange usage of に particle
Thanks so much Chocalate! Great examples. It seems to me like に is a target particle here after all since it seems で has the nuance of YOU being in the location doing the action whereas に seems to just be the result of the action without you necessarily being there. For example: 自分の部屋に(notで)テレビが欲しい It makes sense that it would be に because you aren't "wanting" IN your room (Doing the action of wanting in your room) but instead, you want it to BE in your room. So 世界中に友達を作りたい means that you want to make friends in the world as a result! Therefore 世界中に料理を食べたい is not ok because no result.
Feb
24
comment Strange usage of に particle
世界に友達がいる is the standard usage of に and has nothing to do with my question. I want to know if you can say 世界に料理を食べたい or 大学に友達を作りたい. Before this advertisement I would have said no but now I am forced to say it is a possibility. It isn't taught or written in books, yet it exists, so I can't say anything is right or wrong with any authority anymore. That's why I am asking. Furthermore is 世界で友達を作りたい wrong. Who knows? I want to know what is going on haha.
Feb
24
comment Strange usage of に particle
That's not a problem :) However, do you think you could give me a few more examples of such に particle usage where instead of the normal で you say に?
Feb
24
comment Strange usage of に particle
The problem is I have never been taught this. It's not in any book. So if possible could you please backup your claim or refer me to grammar dot point or anything like that. "Sounds to me like" doesn't really help because I also get feelings from this sentence akin to yours... but I can't apply these feelings to any other sentence because I have this information with no authority or explanation as to how it fits in with the language. I understand there is no concise explanation as to WHY grammar points are as they are, but surely there is an explanation of HOW to use them.
Jan
22
comment Why is it である not にある in this sentence?
I figured as much that that was the case, however there are a few questions still unanswered such as, can it become 'です" is rearranged like I wrote in my question. Also, how would you differentiate the である that shows what something is and the である that shows where something is.
Jan
21
comment Why is it である not にある in this sentence?
In my preloaded ANKI deck. Its got 5 stars so it shooould be good I think.
Dec
29
comment Vague method of description in Japanese
Yes I understand that there are of course situations where that is the case... however that is a case of elision I believe. To me it sounds jagged in English despite it being my first language. I just can't seem to comprehend a long sentence with multiple examples of these and with some of these examples having multiple instances within a single description of a word. I don't mean to deride the language or say it sounds wrong, I am just remarking that I cannot seem to get the hang of it myself. It seems quite difficult.
Dec
29
comment Vague method of description in Japanese
Sorry, I'll refrain next time
Dec
28
comment Vague method of description in Japanese
I feel like people downvoted this because they just wanted to downvote something. Its a legitimate question I feel but if no one wants to answer it then I'll take it elsewhere.
Dec
28
comment Vague method of description in Japanese
Ok so I think I wrote it out pretty well but ok I'll explain again. In English we say "The place WHERE I went yesterday" not "Went yesterday place". Further examples: "The house WHERE I grew up" "The food THAT I ate yesterday" Whilst I'm not trying to say that English is better, I want to know how a language can function without the capitalised connecting words as Japanese seems to. "昨日会った人にまた会いたい" for example... its easy to grasp but still, without these sentence joining parts... don't sentences fall apart when they start getting long or you have lotsof these modified nouns in a sentence.
Dec
18
comment に particle and its conflicting functions
OH!!!! I think you edited your answer above and it is more useful now! When did that happen? I guess it sort of makes sense now that I read it again.
Dec
18
comment に particle and its conflicting functions
Of course. English "to" for example differs a lot in meaning. But, even still, if the meaning is different it doesn't appear in the same part in the sentence. The problem with "To" is one of memorizing the different uses, but that's easy to do because it is only a matter of effort. If "to" appears five times in a sentence, meaning can be gathered from what it is connected to. People tell me に does not offer this, but yet I think it has to or the language wouldn't work. に cannot mean both to and from, it has to simply show a connection to another actor and direction is given by the end verb.