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Dec
27
asked Vague method of description in Japanese
Dec
18
comment に particle and its conflicting functions
OH!!!! I think you edited your answer above and it is more useful now! When did that happen? I guess it sort of makes sense now that I read it again.
Dec
18
comment に particle and its conflicting functions
Of course. English "to" for example differs a lot in meaning. But, even still, if the meaning is different it doesn't appear in the same part in the sentence. The problem with "To" is one of memorizing the different uses, but that's easy to do because it is only a matter of effort. If "to" appears five times in a sentence, meaning can be gathered from what it is connected to. People tell me に does not offer this, but yet I think it has to or the language wouldn't work. に cannot mean both to and from, it has to simply show a connection to another actor and direction is given by the end verb.
Dec
18
comment に particle and its conflicting functions
"I introduced him as 'the teacher'", "He came to me as a friend", "I received chocolate as an omiyage" It is sort of like として... I was under the impression that the に in 先生に言われた was simply being paired with the える that is in 言われる... And in that way に sort of acts as a connector of indirect objects and direction and method was only a secondary nuance. 友達に読める = 友達に+ 読み+える Friend receives by reading 友達に押された = 友達に +押さ + える I don't push but receive (push) from friend. Maybe everyone is right and Japanese doesn't make any sense and they are aliens who can communicate psychically.
Dec
18
comment に particle and its conflicting functions
Thankyou for your input bu is that really answering my question? I mean, I know に has many different uses but the meaning has to be roughly the same. I refuse to believe they wait until the very end of a sentence to understand it because then long sentences wouldn't be possible. There has to be some inherent nuance に has right? Second, "I introduced my friend who is a teacher" is not what I wanted to say. I wanted to say something like "I introduced him AS my friend" not "I introduced him who is my friend" which serves a different purpose of describing what he is not what role he fills.
Dec
18
asked に and として, what are the differences?
Dec
17
asked に particle and its conflicting functions
Dec
13
comment Using に with adjectives
Numerous Japanese people including my Japanese teacher told me they don't say it. I was pondering it on the train this morning. I know you aren't supposed to relate it to another language or it will hinder but I tried it anyway just to start myself off... Saying "This is scary to children" doesn't make sense... and perhaps that's where the iffiness comes from in Japanese. Perhaps にとっては is closer to "for" in this case and that's why it needs to be that way.
Dec
12
asked Using に with adjectives
Nov
17
comment What is the connection between volitional よう form and であろう
So perhaps it is a rare circumstance where it is not so different from it's English counterpart. I guess I'm suggesting that both "will" and でしょう are comprised of prediction and desire... yet the link with desire is stronger in English due to the word "will" and its connotations whereas Japanese is literally a guess due to the "guess particle" SUMMARY OF MY HYPOTHESIS: JAPANESE: A guess of future events based in outside information that can be used to express volition retroactively via your prediction. ”行こうか”"Will we go to the shops?" ENGLISH: Pure volitional statement that leads to a guess.
Nov
17
comment What is the connection between volitional よう form and であろう
No don't apologise this is fantastic! So basically it is like a mixture of my two above hypothesis perhaps. It shows volition in a roundabout way by showing where you place your guess regarding thefuture I mean when we say "I will go to the shops" it is a strong emphasis of us saying what is going to happen.. however since it has not happened yet... it is still a guess.. however because our desires are involved it is a strong guess. Same with "it will rain" being like saying that the rain's "will" is to fall. The connotation is that regardless of what happens, it's "will" will be fulfilled.
Nov
17
comment What is the connection between volitional よう form and であろう
That's all very interesting to read... but I haven't found ANYTHING to do with this "推量の助動詞「う」" that it's talking about which I feel is the key to the problem.
Nov
17
revised What is the connection between volitional よう form and であろう
added 519 characters in body
Nov
17
asked What is the connection between volitional よう form and であろう
Nov
16
comment Dropping から when modifying a noun
Haha... Ohh.... this is awkward... I swear it isn't what it looks like!!!!!
Nov
14
accepted Dropping から when modifying a noun
Nov
14
comment Dropping から when modifying a noun
Thanks man! It's weird to think of Japanese people not being able to make a construction despite having all the components...
Nov
14
asked Dropping から when modifying a noun
Nov
13
accepted をも… what on earth this particle combination?
Nov
13
comment をも… what on earth this particle combination?
Also thankyou Tokyo for your answer, but I of course knew you could mix particles like へ and に with は and も... but I was told never under any circumstance to mix を with another particle, and only to replace it.