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seen Sep 5 at 6:13

Feb
24
revised Strange usage of に particle
added 2 characters in body
Feb
24
asked Strange usage of に particle
Jan
22
comment Why is it である not にある in this sentence?
I figured as much that that was the case, however there are a few questions still unanswered such as, can it become 'です" is rearranged like I wrote in my question. Also, how would you differentiate the である that shows what something is and the である that shows where something is.
Jan
21
accepted Why is it である not にある in this sentence?
Jan
21
comment Why is it である not にある in this sentence?
In my preloaded ANKI deck. Its got 5 stars so it shooould be good I think.
Jan
21
revised Why is it である not にある in this sentence?
edited title
Jan
21
asked Why is it である not にある in this sentence?
Dec
29
comment Vague method of description in Japanese
Yes I understand that there are of course situations where that is the case... however that is a case of elision I believe. To me it sounds jagged in English despite it being my first language. I just can't seem to comprehend a long sentence with multiple examples of these and with some of these examples having multiple instances within a single description of a word. I don't mean to deride the language or say it sounds wrong, I am just remarking that I cannot seem to get the hang of it myself. It seems quite difficult.
Dec
29
comment Vague method of description in Japanese
Sorry, I'll refrain next time
Dec
28
comment Vague method of description in Japanese
I feel like people downvoted this because they just wanted to downvote something. Its a legitimate question I feel but if no one wants to answer it then I'll take it elsewhere.
Dec
28
comment Vague method of description in Japanese
Ok so I think I wrote it out pretty well but ok I'll explain again. In English we say "The place WHERE I went yesterday" not "Went yesterday place". Further examples: "The house WHERE I grew up" "The food THAT I ate yesterday" Whilst I'm not trying to say that English is better, I want to know how a language can function without the capitalised connecting words as Japanese seems to. "昨日会った人にまた会いたい" for example... its easy to grasp but still, without these sentence joining parts... don't sentences fall apart when they start getting long or you have lotsof these modified nouns in a sentence.
Dec
27
asked Vague method of description in Japanese
Dec
18
comment に particle and its conflicting functions
OH!!!! I think you edited your answer above and it is more useful now! When did that happen? I guess it sort of makes sense now that I read it again.
Dec
18
comment に particle and its conflicting functions
Of course. English "to" for example differs a lot in meaning. But, even still, if the meaning is different it doesn't appear in the same part in the sentence. The problem with "To" is one of memorizing the different uses, but that's easy to do because it is only a matter of effort. If "to" appears five times in a sentence, meaning can be gathered from what it is connected to. People tell me に does not offer this, but yet I think it has to or the language wouldn't work. に cannot mean both to and from, it has to simply show a connection to another actor and direction is given by the end verb.
Dec
18
comment に particle and its conflicting functions
"I introduced him as 'the teacher'", "He came to me as a friend", "I received chocolate as an omiyage" It is sort of like として... I was under the impression that the に in 先生に言われた was simply being paired with the える that is in 言われる... And in that way に sort of acts as a connector of indirect objects and direction and method was only a secondary nuance. 友達に読める = 友達に+ 読み+える Friend receives by reading 友達に押された = 友達に +押さ + える I don't push but receive (push) from friend. Maybe everyone is right and Japanese doesn't make any sense and they are aliens who can communicate psychically.
Dec
18
comment に particle and its conflicting functions
Thankyou for your input bu is that really answering my question? I mean, I know に has many different uses but the meaning has to be roughly the same. I refuse to believe they wait until the very end of a sentence to understand it because then long sentences wouldn't be possible. There has to be some inherent nuance に has right? Second, "I introduced my friend who is a teacher" is not what I wanted to say. I wanted to say something like "I introduced him AS my friend" not "I introduced him who is my friend" which serves a different purpose of describing what he is not what role he fills.
Dec
18
asked に and として, what are the differences?
Dec
17
asked に particle and its conflicting functions
Dec
13
comment Using に with adjectives
Numerous Japanese people including my Japanese teacher told me they don't say it. I was pondering it on the train this morning. I know you aren't supposed to relate it to another language or it will hinder but I tried it anyway just to start myself off... Saying "This is scary to children" doesn't make sense... and perhaps that's where the iffiness comes from in Japanese. Perhaps にとっては is closer to "for" in this case and that's why it needs to be that way.
Dec
12
asked Using に with adjectives