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Oct
20
comment に vs で: 映画に見る vs 映画で見る
An interesting question and discussion off of my thoughtless (semi)mistake! Thank you, this has been enlightening!
Oct
19
comment Do I say えいがにみました or えいがをみました ?
Though 映画に見ました is valid for 'I saw it in a movie'.
Oct
18
comment “Irregular” 命令形 of some verbs
Is this just a case of the old (shimo-)nidan meireikei surviving in fossilised expressions in Modern Japanese?
Sep
19
comment can 美化語{びかご} create implied subjects?
Are you sure 'beautifies' is really the best word for this? It sounds like it's a kind of honorific that's triggered primarily by the formality level of the sentence as a whole, with some restrictions on inalienably-possessible nouns. It doesn't seem to have anything to do with how phonaesthetically pleasing the word becomes.
Sep
19
comment 「を」 object marker in this 受身形{うけみけい} sentence
@user312440 Not surprising that you can't conceptualise it, since Japanese's 'suffering passive' isn't syntactically a passive at all. It actually -adds- an argument to the verb, changing 'X did Y' (XがYをした) into 'X (unfortunately) got Y done to them by Z' (XがZにYをされた).
Sep
19
comment 「を」 object marker in this 受身形{うけみけい} sentence
@comeauch But they're exactly the same structure. You'd similarly have to change Xさんは、泥棒にお財布を盗ぬすまれた to 泥棒は、Xさんのお財布を盗んだ. And it really does matter to the question, since I'm really very sure this is a suffering passive. You'd translate it as '[subj] (was unfortunate and) got their wallet stolen by a thief'.
Sep
19
comment 「を」 object marker in this 受身形{うけみけい} sentence
@comeauch Yeah, so this is the same thing. (at least the first sentence is, I think we may be miscommunicating a bit - the first sentence looks 100% like a suffering passive to me)
Sep
19
comment 「を」 object marker in this 受身形{うけみけい} sentence
@comeauch Are you sure this isn't a suffering passive? It sounds a whole lot like one to me, but maybe I'm wrong.
Sep
17
comment Trouble understanding grammar in 「名を、柊という。」
@DariusJahandarie Ah, it seems I haven't learned enough about this kind of construction! I analysed it differently than the standard analysis, it seems :P I still am not sure I agree with the standard analysis, but since I don't have a good alternative yet, I'll delete my answer.
Sep
17
comment Trouble understanding grammar in 「名を、柊という。」
I'll edit mine. (Not sure what the downvote is for; if I'm wrong I'd like to know.)
Sep
17
comment History of 馬 and 梅
They're technically loans from Chinese, but they aren't 漢語. They were borrowed from earlier Chinese into earlier Japanese. IIRC these are used as evidence for the theory that Old Chinese was 'sesquisyllabic' (i.e. it allowed two-syllable words with very light first syllables), but I'm not sure I'm remembering right.
Sep
17
comment Trouble understanding grammar in 「名を、柊という。」
@非回答者 - If you could explain that a bit deeper, that'd be great ^_^ I don't really understand what you mean by that.
Sep
13
comment 〜くはない vs 〜くない in adjective negations
詰まりこの場合にも「は」は対比に使われているんですね?
Sep
11
comment How to negate “べき”? (ie. “should not”)
How about 「~べきじゃない」?
Sep
10
comment What is the meaning of のか and how does it differ from か?
The second one is a bit clearer. The difference here is that するのか・しないのか implies that the listener is doing something that could be interpreted either way, and it's asking for clarification as to the listener's intentions. Without の it's a simple question of 'are you coming or not'; with の it's more 'you haven't made it clear if you plan to come or not (even though you may have been talking about it) - are you acting this way because you're going to come, or are you acting this way because you're not going to come?'.
Sep
10
comment What is the meaning of のか and how does it differ from か?
It's a bit difficult (especially since の can be pretty idiomatic), and these aren't the clearest examples, but I'll give it a try. The first one is a case of an idiom where の adds a sense of 'should' - 'he doesn't know how he should read kanji', rather than 'he doesn't know how to read kanji' (not that there's much of a difference).
Sep
10
comment What is the meaning of のか and how does it differ from か?
@desseim I don't have a specific book source. I'm not sure I agree with your explanation that it's purely a question of intensity either, though I think you're right that there can be an intensity difference between the two.
Sep
8
comment Etymological origin of -n in 洗 (セン)
@3to5businessdays - those are just the regular results of Japanese's borrowing strategies. Japanese didn't have /x/ or /ŋ/, and so it borrowed those as /k/ and /u/ (which were the closest it had) - so *xjangH became /kau/. /au/ later became /oo/, giving /koo/.
Aug
28
comment Usage of the pronouns 「我が輩」 and 「方」 in everyday life
Edited to reflect that, thank you @snailboat. I always forget to mention rendaku - I'm so used to it that I barely even think of かた and がた as different things.
Aug
22
comment break down ~いていいと思ってる
@Choko そういうわけでしたか。ありがとうございます!