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Jul
25
comment What is the て-form of みます?
Of course, みまして is pretty unusual, but it is technically the -て form of みます.
Jul
23
comment History of だ、です、 and である
@Lyle - Those two particular cases in that article are only with the sentence-final の, のに and ので (and です basically only with ので). It's not possible to say that sentence, because excepting the above case, な is the 連体形 of 形容動詞 only, never nouns. It's really very rare to see polite forms as 連体形 anyway, and ですので is about the only modern example I can think of that isn't fossilised - you're only supposed to use polite forms in main clauses, and 連体形 verbs are not main verbs (except maybe in borderline cases like with ので, which are probably actively undergoing reanalysis).
Jul
23
comment What does 「なし」in 「問題なし」 mean?
I suppose I considered 「Xなし」 as a fossilised phrase for the purposes of this answer, though that's not entirely accurate, I suppose. I'm not aware of any other modern uses besides that, though.
Jul
21
answered What does 「なし」in 「問題なし」 mean?
Jul
20
comment How would you say “if you don't mind my asking”?
If 失礼ですが works just fine in those cases, though, then I suppose it works as a translation.
Jul
20
comment How would you say “if you don't mind my asking”?
I feel like there are cases, though, where saying that you're sure it's rude would be just weird. The English version is often just insurance against the off-chance that it happens to be rude - of the questions I ask with 'if you don't mind', most are things that I would be fairly surprised if the person I was asking actually did mind answering.
Jul
19
comment How would you say “if you don't mind my asking”?
This sounds like you know it's rude, but at least to me, the English version sounds like you don't know if it's rude or not. Is there something that closer approximates the sense of 'you might well be okay with my asking, but just in case' that the English has?
Jul
18
comment 「〜がする」 the extended use of する (to do)
My understanding is that ~がする constructions do not in any way presuppose an experiencer of the stimulus being described. I'd translate e.g. 音がする as 'there is a noise' rather than 'I hear a noise'.
Jul
17
awarded  Custodian
Jul
17
reviewed Leave Open Kanji stroke type (not stroke order)
Jul
16
comment What does adding お at the end of a word change?
Reasonable reasons for leaving it out!
Jul
16
comment What does adding お at the end of a word change?
We do mark pronouns as accusative (as actually comes up in your example ^_^) - 'I' translates to 私が or 私は, 'me' translates to 私を (and sometimes just 私).
Jul
16
comment Is the 'h' in Japanese pronounced the same as the 'f'?
I'm not sure exactly how it works out in regards to regional variation and so on; all I know is that I most definitely have heard both [ɸɯ] and [hɯ], and consistently one or the other from a given speaker. (I suppose this counts as 'original research', though I assumed it would be mentioned somewhere.)
Jul
15
revised Is the 'h' in Japanese pronounced the same as the 'f'?
I did the your-you're thing -_-
Jul
15
revised Is the 'h' in Japanese pronounced the same as the 'f'?
added 4 characters in body
Jul
15
answered Is the 'h' in Japanese pronounced the same as the 'f'?
Jul
14
reviewed Close How to know whether カ is kanji or katakana
Jul
11
comment What's this -れり ending?
@非回答者 足りる etc. sure, but 足る? Or am I just horribly misinformed?
Jul
10
revised What's this -れり ending?
added 346 characters in body
Jul
10
comment What's this -れり ending?
You're right about that, I don't know that I've ever seen 足る outside of fossilsed or deliberately archaic constructions. I picked it for its equivalence. I'll edit and make that clear, though.