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Jul
29
answered Does 友達 have the plural marker たち “built-in”?
Jul
29
reviewed Close How do you say “Red Coast” in Japanese?
Jul
29
reviewed Leave Open 「~てはいただけません」- Why the は?
Jul
29
comment 「~てはいただけません」- Why the は?
@dainichi I think you're quite right about the vagueness of 'emphasise'. I think Thomas Gross is right to put it in terms of topic/focus, where ゆるして is the topic because the speaker is kind of assuming the listeners know she'll be asking for forgiveness, and いただけません is the focus because she's trying to draw attention to how humbly she's asking.
Jul
29
comment 「~てはいただけません」- Why the は?
Are you sure it's emphasising the -preceding- verb? It sounds to me like it's emphasising the -following- verb (いただく) by -de--emphasising the preceding verb. Am I wrong to think about it this way?
Jul
28
comment What does うぃーす mean?
@snailboat Woah, I never knew about that one! I thought you had to go into the conversion options to get ゐ and ゑ.
Jul
28
comment What does うぃーす mean?
@ZhenLin 's answer reminded me that wi may well be good enough depending on your IME - it works for me with fcitx/anthy.
Jul
28
comment What does うぃーす mean?
@snailboat Ah, I was unaware, thanks ^_^
Jul
28
reviewed Leave Open Is this sentence correct?
Jul
28
comment What does うぃーす mean?
You can do the same thing as x with l too, if you like that better.
Jul
28
answered What does うぃーす mean?
Jul
28
comment Can kanji compounds be formed arbitrarily?
This is mostly just a question of word compounding - kanji are as flexible as words in any other language are. In theory, you can make a compound with 客 and anything else, but it may not make any sense (e.g. what in the world would 客実 mean?). And obviously the meaning will change if you reverse kanji, the same way that English 'shelf book' would mean something other than 'bookshelf'. Kanji aren't in any way special when in comes to compounds.
Jul
25
comment What is the て-form of みます?
Of course, みまして is pretty unusual, but it is technically the -て form of みます.
Jul
23
comment History of だ、です、 and である
@Lyle - Those two particular cases in that article are only with the sentence-final の, のに and ので (and です basically only with ので). It's not possible to say that sentence, because excepting the above case, な is the 連体形 of 形容動詞 only, never nouns. It's really very rare to see polite forms as 連体形 anyway, and ですので is about the only modern example I can think of that isn't fossilised - you're only supposed to use polite forms in main clauses, and 連体形 verbs are not main verbs (except maybe in borderline cases like with ので, which are probably actively undergoing reanalysis).
Jul
23
comment What does 「なし」in 「問題なし」 mean?
I suppose I considered 「Xなし」 as a fossilised phrase for the purposes of this answer, though that's not entirely accurate, I suppose. I'm not aware of any other modern uses besides that, though.
Jul
21
answered What does 「なし」in 「問題なし」 mean?
Jul
20
comment How would you say “if you don't mind my asking”?
If 失礼ですが works just fine in those cases, though, then I suppose it works as a translation.
Jul
20
comment How would you say “if you don't mind my asking”?
I feel like there are cases, though, where saying that you're sure it's rude would be just weird. The English version is often just insurance against the off-chance that it happens to be rude - of the questions I ask with 'if you don't mind', most are things that I would be fairly surprised if the person I was asking actually did mind answering.
Jul
19
comment How would you say “if you don't mind my asking”?
This sounds like you know it's rude, but at least to me, the English version sounds like you don't know if it's rude or not. Is there something that closer approximates the sense of 'you might well be okay with my asking, but just in case' that the English has?
Jul
18
comment 「〜がする」 the extended use of する (to do)
My understanding is that ~がする constructions do not in any way presuppose an experiencer of the stimulus being described. I'd translate e.g. 音がする as 'there is a noise' rather than 'I hear a noise'.