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Feb
17
reviewed Approve suggested edit on what is the difference between ごとに and おきに?
Feb
17
comment What does お察しいたします mean?
@DaveMG: I was also a little concerned that you chose an expression containing the word "guess", where "guess" means "make likely inaccurate conjectures about", which is how the OP interpreted it. This is an interpretation that disagrees with the actual meaning of 察する in this expression as I understand it, which means "guess" only in the sense of "to correctly estimate or conjecture without proof". So, while your translation does fit as a rough culturally equivalent replacement, it seems to invite misunderstanding to mention it when the point of my answer was to explain this sense of 察する.
Feb
17
answered What does お察しいたします mean?
Feb
6
reviewed Approve suggested edit on Why is 間{かん} used to denote some amounts of time but not others?
Feb
6
comment Can んだった and んじゃなかった be used like the past version of んだ and んじゃない?
Always nervous answering questions of Japanese usage instead of interpretation, hope this is correct...
Feb
6
answered Can んだった and んじゃなかった be used like the past version of んだ and んじゃない?
Feb
4
reviewed Approve suggested edit on How do I express “to survive” in a more metaphorical sense?
Feb
4
comment Parsing a specific sentence from a book
In "that blue line" in English, the phrase "blue line" provides "clarification" to the reader of which thing we're talking about -- the blue line. We should already know there is a blue line, and this sentence explains it. ...However, in Japanese, 青い and the other clause is just description. The "clarification", if there is one, is 横線. "That horizontal line--blue it, which is called by the name of 'the HP bar', is my remaining life visualized." (obviously, this is literal and not very pretty or even valid in English...)
Feb
2
reviewed Approve suggested edit on What are the pronunciation differences between speaking and singing Japanese?
Jan
20
comment What is 死す doing in this question?
You had the right attitude approaching the question :D OK, since you've edited, I've tried to turn my comment into a better-formatted answer.
Jan
20
answered What is 死す doing in this question?
Jan
20
comment What is 死す doing in this question?
It looks to me to be キュン死 + すっぞ(=するぞ→すんぞ→すっぞ), キュン死 being a slang word meaning "death from a heart pang caused by seeing something cute". ("death by d'awwing"?) There's so much to this question that I doubt I could just post that and call it an answer, though. Not really sure what to do here.
Jan
17
revised How is determined whether a sound should be romanized into an L versus an R?
Fixed name orthography
Jan
17
answered How is determined whether a sound should be romanized into an L versus an R?
Jan
8
answered Translating ならば受け止めて行くまでさ word for word
Jan
7
comment Usage of noun-modifying である
@istrasci I think if you insert a comma, it becomes acceptable. 私の、ピアニストである姉は (of course in this particular case 私の itself may well be unnecessary). However, I wouldn't say that it's better, unless confusion is a serious possibility.
Jan
6
comment Different meaning of 何?
Thinking about it some more, if we have P(x)=I lose x, and Q=My heart will be forgiven, then the question is asking for the 'x' that satisfies "P(x) implies Q". ...I think the jump from "What x will satisfy this equation?" to "What x MUST I put in to satisfy this equation?" is not a big semantic jump, and justifies the word.
Jan
6
comment Different meaning of 何?
I hesitated about putting "must" in for the same reason, but I don't see another way. The most literal translation that's grammatical in English is the translation (I'll call it "2") immediately below my quote block, but it is unnatural. I think, despite the appearance of the word "must", the final translation(3) is as close as you can get to the 2nd translation in natural English. For instance, "What 'will' I lose before my heart is forgiven"(4) doesn't work; translations 1 and 2 ask about consequences of possible events, whereas (4) says that events WILL actually happen.
Jan
6
comment Different meaning of 何?
Both of those example sentences have 何 followed by か, which creates the meaning "any". If the original sentence had 何か, the translation in the question would be correct, certainly.
Jan
6
comment Different meaning of 何?
I don't think the second half's meaning impacts the understanding of the grammar, but yes -- a better answer could be written by someone who had that understanding >_< Sorry this is all I could manage. (However, it's part of a song (the first line), so I'm not even sure that its meaning is unambiguous in the first place. Here's a link to lyrics if anyone wants to look for more context.)