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Sep
6
comment Premature optimization is the root of all evil
In both this answer and execjosh's answer we have statements translating say in say about 97% of the time as 言う, 語る, and 考える, and treating time as if it referred to execution time. All these are mistranslations in my opinion. "say about 97% of the time" means the same as "in, let me name a number, about 97% of cases". Say here means 例えば・そうだね、, and it should be more like 小さな効率は、そうだね、約97%の割合で忘れるべきだ。 Posted as a comment not an answer because it's not actually part of the text the OP wanted translated.
Sep
6
comment Differences between いよいよ / やっと / ようやく / ついに and とうとう
I was looking at テレビ・シリーズが、ついに終わる and I wonder -- are やっと and ようやく the only ones that could imply a negative nuance there, as if the series deserved to be cancelled? ついに describes that this is the climax of work, so sounds positive, and いよいよ implies that the event is hotly anticipated, so that's positive too. But やっと's "finally" can focus on the "gradual" bit-by-bit trudging along of the series, and sound negative. And the same for ようやく?
Aug
30
reviewed Reject suggested edit on How to call the phenomenon where a rectangle Ϳ is shown because font misses glyph?
Aug
16
awarded  Enlightened
Aug
16
awarded  Nice Answer
Jul
27
answered modifying of 後ろ
Jul
23
answered What does '今よ' mean?
Jul
22
revised Is 「でいい」 the same as 「でもいい」?
As indicated in the comments, the question is about で vs でも not で vs て(も). Editing to remove confusion / unclearness that lead to an answer the OP didn't want.
Jul
14
answered How to say “I am unfortunately getting frustrated”
Jul
13
comment Why are Japanese song lyrics often so seemingly ungrammatical?
As I see it -- a semicolon. And then another related clause. Continuative prevents the sentence from ending and ties the thoughts together ("In a forest of ウージ we met; under the ウージ we parted for all time")
Jun
21
comment Sentence ending with -とでも
That's how I've always understood it, yes. I'd be surprised (but interested) to hear that it is a different meaning.
Jun
21
comment Can anyone explain the grammar behind the “sentence ending” とでも?
Agh, damn. I didn't see this and answered in the other question... Mhhh.
Jun
21
answered Sentence ending with -とでも
Jun
13
awarded  Yearling
Jun
11
awarded  Excavator
Jun
11
revised When to use ください (kudasai) or お願いします (onegaishimasu) in requests?
Correction also in body text
Jun
9
answered Can 一応ね be understood to mean “…just socially.”?
Jun
6
answered What are the ways to conjugate “I” and “to be” (in romaji)
Jun
2
comment Why use 分 in this question?
For perhaps clearer wording -- if I apply your bolded translation to the second example, it comes out as "This is part of the things I am giving to Abi" -- can you see how that differs (wrongly) from "This is Abi's share"?
Jun
2
comment Why use 分 in this question?
Realized my → notation might have been confusing. Edited. What I mean is that 分 here tells you this box belongs to the "part" (of all things) that is for the rubbish, implying the presence of another "part" that is not for rubbish. It doesn't mean that the box is "part" of the rubbish (as in your bold), implying that there is another "part" that is also for the rubbish. As I understand it.