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seen Feb 13 at 23:49

Oct
20
comment 童貞が許されるのは小学生までだよね - translation of まで
You can certainly say using まで that "even kids" are doing a thing X which is more normal for adults. In fact I think it is not (always necessarily) age-based but rather expectation-based. The implication is that the groups that are doing X are extensive and include those who are expected to be doing X, and the range of included people extends "up to even" the less-expected group marked by まで (e.g. kids). What the expected group is depends on context.
Oct
19
comment What does this sentence mean? These katakana are confusing me
Welcome :) Good explanation of 間違っても.
Oct
18
revised Distinction between “not everyone” and “no-one”
added が by Tsuyoshi Ito's correction
Oct
17
comment What is the meaning and usage of 許せ?
I've seen it in fiction when there's familiarity and the thing to be forgiven is minor.
Oct
17
comment What is the literal meaning of 'マスコミにバラして'?
@ちょこれーと Fixed it. List syntax can be a bit awkward. If you don't indent the new paragraphs (beginning with ) to make them "part of" the list item, then it interprets that new paragraph as being after the list and ending it, and therefore, because you ended the list, item 2 below it is the beginning of a new list, which it starts at 1 for some reason despite what number you actually used :x
Oct
17
revised What is the literal meaning of 'マスコミにバラして'?
fixed the list
Oct
16
comment How do I interpret this question that ends with よ?
@snailboat Thanks, looks useful :) A shame it doesn't touch on "<statement> yo?", only on "<question> yo", e.g. "ima nanji da yo" / "~~ ka yo".
Oct
16
comment What is the literal meaning of 'マスコミにバラして'?
I linked this as an answer-comment too, but see this for よ? : japanese.stackexchange.com/a/6534/315
Oct
15
answered Distinction between “not everyone” and “no-one”
Oct
13
comment Japanese equivalent of “Thanks anyway.”?
確かに、あの例文の人からは感謝の気持ちをまったく感じられませんね・・・しかし、質問者にそのつもりはなかったと思います。本当に求めているのは、「お気持ちだけで嬉し‌​い」のような表現のはずです。・・・ですがそれは、店員さんに向かって言える言葉ではありませんし、その場合は何と言えばいいと思いますか? (探しているものを店員さんが‌​見つけることができなかった場合。) 残念ながら私は、その辺りのニュアンスがよく分からなくて、回答できません・・・
Oct
12
answered Question about ように
Oct
2
comment Problems parsing this sentence (ような before comma)
(2) a comma can come between a modifier and its head ... can it? >_< Do you have any other examples? I am aware of plenty of "unintuitive" comma placement in Japanese but I can't remember such an example. Ordinarily a comma indicates that the immediately following noun is not the head but another modifier. (Assuming I understand the term "head" correctly ... here as referring to 子.) ------- (Other than that pick about そんな, I agree with your thoughts on the structure of the sentence.)
Oct
2
comment Problems parsing this sentence (ような before comma)
(1) I don't think そんな is modifying 人, but I'm not sure whether to say it's modifying 子. It probably is, but it's linked very closely to "relative clause B", maybe more than it is to the actual final noun "子". It's like the speaker uses そんな (and then pauses for a bit indicated by the comma) to describe that he's trying to find the best words to use for relative clause B.
Sep
6
comment Premature optimization is the root of all evil
In both this answer and execjosh's answer we have statements translating say in say about 97% of the time as 言う, 語る, and 考える, and treating time as if it referred to execution time. All these are mistranslations in my opinion. "say about 97% of the time" means the same as "in, let me name a number, about 97% of cases". Say here means 例えば・そうだね、, and it should be more like 小さな効率は、そうだね、約97%の割合で忘れるべきだ。 Posted as a comment not an answer because it's not actually part of the text the OP wanted translated.
Sep
6
comment Differences between いよいよ / やっと / ようやく / ついに and とうとう
I was looking at テレビ・シリーズが、ついに終わる and I wonder -- are やっと and ようやく the only ones that could imply a negative nuance there, as if the series deserved to be cancelled? ついに describes that this is the climax of work, so sounds positive, and いよいよ implies that the event is hotly anticipated, so that's positive too. But やっと's "finally" can focus on the "gradual" bit-by-bit trudging along of the series, and sound negative. And the same for ようやく?
Aug
30
reviewed Reject How to call the phenomenon where a rectangle Ϳ is shown because font misses glyph?
Aug
16
awarded  Enlightened
Aug
16
awarded  Nice Answer
Jul
27
answered modifying of 後ろ
Jul
23
answered What does '今よ' mean?