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visits member for 2 years, 10 months
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Jan
31
answered I dont understand ~ような in this context
Jan
25
comment なんか after て- form of a verb
I would state explicitly that なんか・など disparages (the idea/mention of) the previous noun/verb. "Emphasis against" isn't specific/obvious enough, and "such things as" can be misinterpreted as representing nothing more than a list. But I think the idea of using "such a thing" is a good one for representing this nuance of なんか・など, so +1.
Jan
21
answered What is the nuance of 解{げ}す?
Jan
21
comment What is the nuance of 解{げ}す?
@silvermaple I felt that I had too many "I think"s to put it as an answer, and it's not exactly fleshed out ;) Well, I'll post it.
Jan
21
comment What is the nuance of 解{げ}す?
I mainly encounter this in the potential-negative, I think, as 解{げ}せない. It feels to me like "incomprehensible", "cannot fathom" etc., as opposed to "can't understand" -- like you can't even begin to unravel an explanation for it. It's mainly used when talking about failure to understand people's motivations, I think?
Jan
20
awarded  Enlightened
Jan
18
awarded  Nice Answer
Jan
17
answered Why is the Hepburn system of romanization generally used over the Nihon-shiki system?
Jan
10
comment When is it okay to use あります with a living subject?
I keep expecting this question to be about phrases like 子供がある -- in fact, if I was going to ask a question about 子供がある, this is probably the title I would use -- but that issue is only touched on briefly in the comments of an answer. Perhaps this question should be renamed? Something like "Why is でもあります used instead of でもいます for a living subject?"
Jan
9
comment Japanese translation for “bakka!” (Not Baka)
istrasci's answer handles your question perfectly as asked, but I get the impression that "I'm curious how it would affect the spelling of it" wasn't your intention, and that you actually meant to say "I'm curious how it [the meaning] would be affected by the spelling of it with two K's"...
Jan
2
comment Why did this pirate get angry when he was given a bottle?
@Flaw なりゃしねー = なりはしない = ならない with added emphasis on negative.
Jan
2
answered Why did this pirate get angry when he was given a bottle?
Jan
1
comment Help with には and にとって
Also compare with これは我々にとって問題だ (acceptable).
Dec
31
comment How do I read the kanji in this ad for mascara?
Good explanation of the terms asked for in the question, but the translation at the end is a bit shaky. 艶ロング is a noun referencing the eyelashes in a descriptive way, and 凛と際立つ is modifying that noun, not serving as an imperative. (Also, I believe 艶ロング more normally refers to hair -- note that ロング can be short for ロングヘア, see also 艶髪ロング -- and so I would guess that the point is using a term that would normally reference shiny long hair to describe eyelashes instead, to create some kind of visual impression / comparison. The gloss of long hair is easily imagined and translated to eyelashes.)
Dec
26
answered Tense of どういうつもりだ…
Dec
23
comment Can 彼 be used as an indefinite pronoun like やつ or 男?
@sawa Your argument seems to imply that 彼が欲しい (I want "a" boyfriend) is not valid Japanese ... or am I misunderstanding?
Dec
14
comment Why are there 3 ways of writing in Japanese?
@sawa Yes to both of those (although I'm not technically sure whether it has to be more than one language - does English have two alphabets {A-Z} and {a-z}, or just one, with each letter in that alphabet having two written forms?).
Dec
14
answered Politeness in examination questions
Dec
14
comment Why are there 3 ways of writing in Japanese?
@sawa I've seen this misconception a few times before, possibly due to the Japanese use of the word アルファベット, but "alphabet" in English cannot mean "a character or letter, such as 'a', 'b', or 'c'". It only means "a (full) set of letters which can be combined to form words in a language".
Dec
13
revised How to use から and だから as conjunctions?
deleted 94 characters in body