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Jun
13
awarded  Yearling
Jan
28
accepted What does 曰く mean when it is *not* preceded by a name?
Jan
28
comment What does 曰く mean when it is *not* preceded by a name?
This explanation seems to work (I'm finding more examples in the context of the quoted speakers being "general opinion" or "random opinions of the public"). It also seems that the quoted person can be "obvious from preceding context" (e.g. some documents are mentioned, then, 曰く, the information in those documents). ... I think I may have been thrown for a loop by a nonstandard usage I saw somewhere else. Thanks :)
Jan
27
asked What does 曰く mean when it is *not* preceded by a name?
Jan
26
answered How to say “I don't know what you're referring to”?
Jan
25
comment Is there a name for kanji compounds consisting of kanji with the same radical and for compounds with repeated kanji?
I like the look of 齟齬 too, because the left side is quite unusual as well as being complicated and duplicated.
Nov
20
asked How can we understand and translate はず used with facts of known truth?
Nov
8
answered What's the first character in the phrase 「?度乾燥しなさい」?
Nov
5
comment the omission of an implied “の” creates the appearance of a 四字熟語{よじじゅくご}?
This answer explains what counts and what does not count as a 四字熟語, but I don't think it quite answers the thrust of the question the OP is asking, which seems -- and I would agree if someone said it was not clear -- to be: how are these "constructed words" used in speech and writing (what are the limits to their use -- how often can you stick nouns together like this, why is it done, what is the style, and how can they be interpreted). I +1'd the OP's above comment which re-iterates this.
Nov
3
comment 使ってみなさい, and 使っても意味のない場所
More hints: 宝箱やツボの中から入手できる modifies 矢束、爆弾など by the "verb in plain form immediately followed by a noun" pattern, so it should be the arrows, bombs etc. **that** you can get inside treasure chests and jars which is then the topic for the rest of the sentence. Also, ヒントである means is a hint and <clause>ことが多い means it is often (the case) that <clause>, there are many (situations, times) where <clause>. (It has to be である and not だ, which means the same thing, because only である can modify the following noun こと.)
Oct
8
answered What is meant/implied by “じゃないんだからね”?
Oct
6
comment 「予定調和」 usage in casual speech
From a visual novel, when talking about how nothing unexpected can happen when playing with dolls because you control everything: 「人の世において、予定調和ほど退屈なものはない。だから、ぬいぐるみは世界で一番のお友達でありながらも、いつかは飽き、卒業する...」 Maybe in English we'd just say "Nothing in the human world is as boring as the status quo"? "as everything going according to plan"? Referencing the term "pre-established harmony" seems to me like something an English writer wouldn't do very often.
Oct
6
comment 「予定調和」 usage in casual speech
@snailboat I would think so. I have noticed this phrase coming up far more often in Japanese media than I would expect the phrase "pre-established harmony" (its EDICT translation) to occur in English media. It feels like either: it is more familiar a concept to Japanese audiences; or they use a complex term with a more basic meaning, where we might use a simpler phrase.
Sep
12
awarded  Nice Answer
Aug
17
answered Meaning of ひとつで自由に出せるように
Aug
10
revised Properly translating a conditional
Made inline list slightly more readable by differentiating major and minor list delimiters (major = semicolons, minor = commas)
Aug
3
comment Adnominalisation (Relative clause - noun - copula structure): What does it mean? How can we translate it?
We discussed this a little here: japanese.stackexchange.com/questions/3586/…
Jul
31
comment Meaning of そうして
I interpreted it as 「そうして…話す」, not 「そうして…わかる」 ...
Jul
27
awarded  Enlightened
Jul
27
awarded  Nice Answer