3,629 reputation
534
bio website althack.org
location Cambridge, MA
age 22
visits member for 1 year, 6 months
seen 2 hours ago

Native English speaker, beginner in Japanese. Interested in Japanese grammar & etymology.


2h
comment Where does です come from?
@JoeZ. That's right.
2d
comment Why do we have to use ている form of 思う with third person subject
That's not what that sentence means -- the only reasonable translation is into present tense: "I think he's a good guy."
Jul
29
comment Why do we have to use ている form of 思う with third person subject
FYI, this is downvoted because it fails to explain why sentences like 私は彼がいいやつだと思う are totally fine.
Jul
29
comment Why do we have to use ている form of 思う with third person subject
I think it's much improved by aborting the attempt to make a parallel. This is somewhere where Japanese is just different.
Jul
28
comment What is the difference between 危ない and 危うい?
寒がり is modern. I just typed some random words in and that was the first that had low enough hits for me to make my point. :)
Jul
28
comment What is the difference between 危ない and 危うい?
Namely, if you look in BCCWJ, 危うい has 172 hits of things published after 1990. Not nearly as common as 危ない, but still quite common if you compare it to other things in the corpus (e.g., 寒がり gets 77 hits).
Jul
27
comment Why do we have to use ている form of 思う with third person subject
"Hiroko is thinking to go abroad" is pretty marginal for me.
Jul
27
comment Why do we have to use ている form of 思う with third person subject
Possibly of use: japanese.stackexchange.com/a/13603/3097
Jul
15
comment Is ending question sentences with の really feminine?
I was thinking about this against recently -- 今何をしてる ? actually sounds fine as an honest inquiry to me. Is the interpretation you mentioned in your answer the only interpretation you have of it?
Jul
8
comment Meaning of て form + えん
I think whether it is a nominalizer or not is not an interesting question anyways. A "nominalizer" is a purely syntactic concept, and I don't think it matters too much whether you analyze 会いたいの as a noun or not in this case. The more interesting question is what it's doing semantically (and its syntactic status will probably follow).
Jun
25
comment “Ungrammatical” 丁寧語 used by tour guides and museum narrators
@Choko 若者言葉だけではなくて、ちょっと女っぽいしゃべり方と思わないか?
Jun
13
comment A Deeper Look Unto て, で and は
FWIW, I think it's clear what he's asking, it's just a difficult question to answer. (I know I personally don't have the motivation to delve into the amount of detail necessary to answer it ATM :-)).
Jun
9
comment Verb classification of honorific/humble verbs
Related: Origin of -aru verbs: いらっしゃる、おっしゃる、くださる、なさる
Jun
7
comment i-adjectives that end in a 〜ない which doesn't seem to be 〜無{な}い
Nice, I didn't think of that connection!
Jun
4
comment Two を in a single sentence - how to understand it?
Seems similar to how "cloth in hand" can act as an adjunct in English. Not sure how perfect that analogue is though.
May
31
comment Do 形容詞 have a 未然形 in Classical Japanese?
I think a really superb answer here would try to discuss in detail what a 未然形 actually is.
May
24
comment Are all 3 sentences the same?
I think you're using a meaning of "grammatical" that a lot of people wouldn't agree with.
May
20
comment 「の」followed by 「…なき」
@user4092 You know what, I think you're right. Thanks for your comment, I've changed that bit of the answer.
May
18
comment 「の」followed by 「…なき」
I understand your gripe with 「の」, and don't have a satisfactory answer. Somehow the syntax is working out here for it to have possession semantics (which I'm considerably sure of). Perhaps it comes down to the 連体形 being "nominal enough", but that's just speculation on my part. Regarding your latter question, I do think that 「遣る瀬無き」 can be replaced by 「遣る瀬無さ」 here, and the meaning is essentially the same, just less old/poetic. But getting a native speaker to verify that might be wise.
May
6
comment When is it acceptable to use “Newspaper grammar”?
BTW, here is my attempt at translating of the quotation, for anyone who can't understand it: "Some people probably use it because they think it will make their writing be more pointed. I'm sure there are also some who think that using taigen-dome leads to a distinctly newspaper-like feeling. I admit that indeed, there are newspapers articles which have skillfully used taigen-dome to exhibit a unique flavor. Thus, I am not saying that one should not use taigen-dome or joshi-dome at all, but simply that I worry about its overusage."