3,970 reputation
535
bio website althack.org
location Cambridge, MA
age 22
visits member for 1 year, 7 months
seen 9 hours ago

Native English speaker, beginner in Japanese. Interested in Japanese grammar & etymology.


Mar
2
comment Difference between ~ざる and ~ぬ
I am also curious about the difference between 〜き and 〜かる and if it's the same as 〜ぬ and 〜ざる. I had always assumed there was just no difference (except perhaps emphasis due to explicitly having ある in it).
Mar
1
comment Is 拝見いたしました an example of 二重敬語?
I wonder, is this feeling only for 拝見, or is any humble 漢語動詞+「いたす」 acceptable? (E.g., 頂戴いたす、拝借いたす、etc.)
Feb
28
comment Is 拝見いたしました an example of 二重敬語?
I imagine it falls into the "慣例として定着している二重敬語の例" section of levelup99.net/businessmanner/cate3post21.html
Feb
26
awarded  Popular Question
Feb
25
comment Is “またまた” actually used by anyone in Japan to mean “bye” or “see you later”?
またまた on its own would probably be interpreted as "Oh you!", as in what you say when someone is kidding about something (yet again).
Feb
20
comment Relative clauses distinguishing whom/with which/that
I have to say this is one of the coolest answers I've ever read. Excellent comparative explanation.
Jan
19
reviewed Close Place to find name popularity rankings?
Jan
18
awarded  Yearling
Jan
17
asked What is this 「も」?
Jan
15
comment Does using the characters です at the end of a sentence make almost everything(depending on the sentence) sound polite?
@tabibito As far as grammatical analysis goes, such sentences are treated as having a "zero copula" (often denoted as ∅ in linguistics). That is to say, the sentence does still have a verb, its just that the verb's surface form is nothing. This can actually happen in English newspaper headlines: "Teacher credited with disarming gunman"; there is still an "is" in there semantically. In Japanese it is not limited to newspaper headlines of course.
Jan
15
comment Does using the characters です at the end of a sentence make almost everything(depending on the sentence) sound polite?
All three can be written and spoken. In formal writing である is used, but in non-formal writing any of the three can be used (depending on desired effect). I did not mention である because it further complicates things by adding another dimension (formality) and I figured that it wouldn't be useful to the asker to start discussing more formal language.
Jan
15
revised Does using the characters です at the end of a sentence make almost everything(depending on the sentence) sound polite?
added 2 characters in body
Jan
15
answered Does using the characters です at the end of a sentence make almost everything(depending on the sentence) sound polite?
Jan
15
comment What is the difference (if any) between these two sentences?
let us continue this discussion in chat
Jan
14
comment What is the difference (if any) between these two sentences?
I don't think it's a bad parallel, I just think it's not a useful parallel to explain the difference between these two sentence's meanings. In other words, I don't think mirroring the Japanese syntax into the English syntax is particularly helpful for understanding the nuance in meaning here. Of course, if you feel it is helpful to yourself, then by all means; it's your answer.
Jan
14
comment What is the difference (if any) between these two sentences?
If you want a translation in English which captures the nuance and has "do" in it, "In school, studying is what I want to do" is an option, but personally I think the "do" parallel is harmful rather than helpful here.
Jan
14
revised What is the difference (if any) between these two sentences?
added 10 characters in body
Jan
14
comment What is the difference (if any) between these two sentences?
I do not think 勉強をしたい is inherently unnatural, I think it's just unnatural in this case due to the context. I guess we just disagree on that point, which is driving our different explanations.
Jan
14
answered What is the difference (if any) between these two sentences?
Jan
14
comment What is the difference (if any) between these two sentences?
I don't think an argument based on syntax really helps illuminate what the semantic difference is. 大学で勉強をしたい doesn't sound unnatural because it sounds ungrammatical (like the English), but rather because the focus is weird for this specific sentence.