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1041
bio website althack.org
location Cambridge, MA
age 23
visits member for 2 years
seen 4 hours ago

Native English speaker, beginner in Japanese.

Interested in Japanese grammar & etymology.


Oct
30
comment Can ~もの be applied to all verbs to make them a noun?
I think "[stem form] + [noun]" is one of the most productive way of forming new nouns along with dropping no in "[noun] + no + [noun]". It's just that forming new nouns can be weird if there isn't a good reason for it or the meaning isn't clear. "[dictionary form] + [noun]" is a grammatical construction which forms a nominal, not really a noun.
Oct
27
answered Is the negative form of 住む related to すみません (i.e. “I'm sorry”/“Excuse me”), and how is it used in actual conversation?
Oct
25
comment Dictionary form of verb to indicate progressive actions or actions in progress?
Why is this getting downvoted? Seems accurate to me.
Oct
25
comment Help me understand the grammar of this sentence: ~のこと~のこと、~なってもらえたかな
@Wlerin Hmm. Aside from that, there isn't any one specific thing, but overall it feels like something an アイドル would say due to the respectful but simultaneously casual tone combined with the somewhat cutesy question. But this is just my impression of it, and I'm not a native speaker, so who knows.
Oct
24
comment Help me understand the grammar of this sentence: ~のこと~のこと、~なってもらえたかな
s/a subject/an experiencer or an agent/, and I agree. :-) こと can definitely be the grammatical subject of passives and of some predicates, such as 彼のことが分かる、彼のことが心配だ、彼のことが恋しい、彼のことが頭から離れない. I suppose you could consider these nominative objects, but it seems odd to do that in the case of passives.
Oct
24
reviewed Approve What's the difference between そうです and そうでしょう?
Oct
24
comment Help me understand the grammar of this sentence: ~のこと~のこと、~なってもらえたかな
Related (regarding 「〜のこと」): What is the こと in sentences such as あなたのことが好きだ?
Oct
24
comment What's the difference between -ga and -o when they are used to designate a direct object?
Both を and が are both appropriate with the potential form, like the other answers point out. 「私はピアノが引けることができます。」 is not correct Japanese; you used both of the potential forms at once.
Oct
24
answered Help me understand the grammar of this sentence: ~のこと~のこと、~なってもらえたかな
Oct
23
revised Specialized banking/credit card vocabulary
Improve formatting, tighten title, minor register and stylistic changes
Oct
23
comment To which part of speech belong 〜とはいえ and 〜というものの, and as what part of sentence are they usually used?
He was asking what they would be classified as if they were reanalyzed as single units, not how to break them down.
Oct
22
answered What is this character?
Oct
22
comment Do ちょうだい、ごらん、ください、おいで constitute an own class of part of speech?
It seemed to me like the OP already knew their meaning and was asking about their syntactic status in the language...
Oct
21
comment “~において、…” vs. “~にとって、…” differences?
@user312440 「〜まして」 is fine. You should separate that into a different question so it doesn't muddle this one.
Oct
21
comment How to say “had been [verbing]”?
@user312440 (1) There is no such thing as a "perfect tense". (2) Because syntax and semantics are so easily confused, statements like "Japanese has no future tense" are misleading for a lot of people. It is not difficult to construct sentences in Japanese which are semantically unambiguously referring to future events using modals and adjuncts. (3) Just because some grammatical element does not line up perfectly with a specific aspect or tense doesn't mean we should throw our hands up and give up trying to describe it -- thinking in such terms can still be quite useful.
Oct
21
comment What “non-standard” katakana are commonly used?
Oh, they aren't officially considered "non-standard" I don't think. The scare quotes are still necessary upon first introduction of that terminology. I was just using "non-standard" to mean any katakana that don't have their corresponding hiragana in use (e.g., ふぁ、くぉ, and such are all very uncommon).
Oct
21
comment Could ルフレ be considered a gender-neutral name?
Sounds gender-neutral to me. Maybe with a tiny slant towards female (just like "Robin" for me, really). I will let a Japanese person answer though.
Oct
21
revised What “non-standard” katakana are commonly used?
Reword to not be a question looking for a resource, and try to narrow the scope a little
Oct
21
comment How to say “had been [verbing]”?
「来ることを知っていたら、部屋を奇麗にした。」 seems a little unnatural to me... I would use 「来ると知っていたら、部屋をきれいにしたのに。」 or 「来ると知っていたら、部屋をきれいにしただろう。」 depending on what I was trying to say.
Oct
21
reviewed Leave Open Could someone please clarify if I'm translating these two sentences correctly?