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bio website althack.org
location Cambridge, MA
age 23
visits member for 2 years, 2 months
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Native English speaker, beginner in Japanese.

Interested in Japanese grammar & etymology.


Dec
29
comment Are there more irregular verbs like 行く?
@meireikei I'm not aware of anyone else using it in linguistics. The format is occasionally used for computer science proofs, invented/championed by Dijkstra: cs.utexas.edu/users/EWD/transcriptions/EWD13xx/EWD1300.html
Dec
21
comment を without a transitive verb?
[...] So, if you choose to raise something other than the object in the underlying sentence to the subject, it is because you have a pretty intense belief that that thing is being affected, even though the original sentence doesn't suggest it (that is: while objects in active sentences are often affected to some degree, adjuncts generally are not at all, so raising them to the subject is quite a shift in affectedness).
Dec
21
comment を without a transitive verb?
(2) I hope you understand that the "why" question isn't an easy question to answer, but my best attempt is that it's not just about particles -- it's about information structure. Namely, when you raise anything to the subject, it is because you want to somehow center the discussion around it; because the effects on it are what is important. [...]
Dec
21
comment を without a transitive verb?
@Rurfs (1) The underlying active sentence of 「手紙が他の人に見られた」 is 「他の人が手紙を見た」. As you can see, there is no 「私の」 in this underlying active sentence, which is why it doesn't have the "my" implication in the passive.
Dec
21
comment を without a transitive verb?
(Although one could argue that it's exactly the same as in Japanese, it's just that in English you get a notion of positive affectedness, while in Japanese you get negative affectedness. I've never seen such an argument before though!)
Dec
21
comment を without a transitive verb?
@blutorange I know what you're trying to say there, but unfortunately "I had" in English can also mean 〜てもらった, which I think is the default reading of that sentence (as opposed to the passive one you're trying to invoke).
Dec
21
revised を without a transitive verb?
added 26 characters in body
Dec
21
comment を without a transitive verb?
I applied it to your example. I'm not sure if the explanation is adequately simple, but I'm not sure if there's a simpler one that explains all the implications.
Dec
21
revised を without a transitive verb?
added 730 characters in body
Dec
21
comment を without a transitive verb?
(If that doesn't answer your question, let me know what's confusing you and I can edit in some more details.)
Dec
21
answered を without a transitive verb?
Dec
19
comment If 「は」 marks a topic, and 「が」 marks a subject, what does 「です」 do in terms of nuance?
I don't think this is really true. Although it's rare to splice である with things other than は, も, etc., it does seem to happen. (See the thread I linked to in my comment on the question.)
Dec
19
comment If 「は」 marks a topic, and 「が」 marks a subject, what does 「です」 do in terms of nuance?
Related: Splicing である with a topic
Dec
15
reviewed Leave Open Function of ' のあるところで '
Dec
15
reviewed Leave Open Did ある and いる once have kanji?
Dec
15
revised How does the order of place and subject affect the meaning of a sentence using the verb iru
Improve formatting.
Dec
13
comment 名詞の修飾と「~か」・「~かどうか」についての質問
一般的に言えば、埋め込み文では「は」が使えます。例:「彼は来ないと思います。」(対比を表します。)でも「〜か」の場合は、なかなか変に聞こえます。少なくとも、私は‌​自然に聞こえる文を思い付かないです。
Dec
13
revised 名詞の修飾と「~か」・「~かどうか」についての質問
added 27 characters in body
Dec
13
revised 名詞の修飾と「~か」・「~かどうか」についての質問
added 68 characters in body
Dec
13
revised 名詞の修飾と「~か」・「~かどうか」についての質問
deleted 1 character in body