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Oct
22
comment How do 行く and 来る *really* work?
Oh dear, 「明日、太郎があなたのところに来ます」 from that paper... things are even more complicated than I started speculating in this question... haha :-).
Oct
22
asked How do 行く and 来る *really* work?
Oct
20
awarded  Pundit
Oct
19
comment だけでなく and だけじゃなくて
Wow, nice first contribution -- welcome! I know you're comparing でない and ではない here, but confusingly じゃない's distribution is different from both of them. It seems to work almost anywhere, like 〜じゃなくてよかった, 〜じゃないとダメ and such are fine despite ではない not working.
Oct
19
awarded  Notable Question
Oct
18
comment Why is を used with passive form here?
Thanks! I see what you're saying now. It does seem like higher-valency verbs tend to not raise the を-marked argument, but there are times which they do too... for example, "The teacher sent an email to his students" 先生が生徒にメールを送った → "The email was sent to the students from the teacher" メールは先生から生徒に送られた. I wonder what is ultimately dictating the tendency... maybe it's that patients of higher-valency verbs tend to be the least important piece of information in the sentence, making it weird to subjectify them?
Oct
18
comment Why is を used with passive form here?
I guess I'm confused by what you mean by "the direct object of the action is marked with を in both cases". Isn't the direct object by definition what is marked by を? But anyways, I think what I was trying to point out as an inaccuracy (as opposed to unclarity) is "If there is no indirect object, then the direct object is what's marked with が in passive sentences." -- you can raise whatever you want in the active sentence to が in the passive sentence (aside from the original thing marked by が, of course), with variations in meaning.
Oct
18
comment Why is を used with passive form here?
I don't think this explanation is quite right. Normally passivization goes like が→に + を→が. Your sentences are of course correct, but what is going on is が→に + の→が. In particular, 先生が(私の)名前を聞きました→(私が)先生に名前を聞かれました. And usually, when you raise の→が it has the negative connotation. (私に->私が is also another possibility for this sentence.)
Oct
15
comment Does the Japanese language have an American variant?
Maybe date/time formats? Anyways, isn't just clicking on it the fastest way to find out?
Oct
12
comment Are “と” and “から” equal when they mean “from”?
Thanks, that helps a lot! In particular the "the primary mover" bit really highlights the different I think.
Oct
12
comment Are “と” and “から” equal when they mean “from”?
By "separate with" I assume you don't mean the usage of it in "I separated from the group with John" or the usage of it in "He separated the cheese block with a knife"? Do you have an example?
Oct
9
comment Particle に when related to state and how to recognize a verb as a state
@Nate You can say "He is waiting" 彼は待っている, or "He is waiting for the bus" 彼はバスを待っている. Just like in English, there is a verb "to wait" 待つ, and another verb with the same form but slightly different meaning, "to wait for ~" 〜を待つ. The latter verb does have an argument, marked by 〜を, but it isn't a locative argument. So if you want to provide extra information of where the waiting is happening, you use 〜で.
Oct
9
comment Using 〜てある as a future tense?
(For what it's worth, there's also the "spelling mistake" close reason, but this seems like something which others could actually benefit from, so I think we should leave it open!)
Oct
9
comment Particle に when related to state and how to recognize a verb as a state
I understand what you're saying re (1), but I think it's a misanalysis. How about に泊まる? に勤める? にある? It seems tough to claim that they all involve movement. Also, even someone who lives in Tokyo can say これからも東京に住むつもりだ。, so I don't think it means "move", I think it just means "live in"/"reside in". (I hope it doesn't seem like I'm nitpicking here! I gave it my best shot in my own answer -- also the downvote wasn't me :-).
Oct
9
awarded  Nice Answer
Oct
8
comment Particle に when related to state and how to recognize a verb as a state
I think this answer confuses a lot of concepts. (1) The 〜に in 行く・来る, etc. is specifically about directional movement, and can be replaced with 〜へ. 〜に住む has nothing to do with movement and can't be replaced with 〜へ. (2) 〜ている has multiple functions, one of which is the progressive, while another one is the resultative. In the case of 君を愛している it is not the progressive ("I am loving you"/"I am in the process of loving you"/君を愛しつつある), it really just is the resultative and means ("I love you"/"I am in love with you").
Oct
8
revised Particle に when related to state and how to recognize a verb as a state
added 20 characters in body
Oct
8
answered Particle に when related to state and how to recognize a verb as a state
Oct
8
comment Is there a Japanese equivalent to the phrase, “when in Rome”?
@virmaior I think the duplicate functionality is only supposed to be used when the question is a duplicate, not when the answer to this question can be found in another answer.
Oct
6
comment What is it about ~まして?
Why was this downvoted? Seems fine to me.