5,048 reputation
739
bio website althack.org
location Cambridge, MA
age 22
visits member for 1 year, 9 months
seen 2 hours ago

Native English speaker, beginner in Japanese.

Interested in Japanese grammar & etymology.


6h
revised Specialized banking/credit card vocabulary
Improve formatting, tighten title, minor register and stylistic changes
9h
comment To which part of speech belong 〜とはいえ and 〜というものの, and as what part of sentence are they usually used?
He was asking what they would be classified as if they were reanalyzed as single units, not how to break them down.
14h
answered What is this character?
17h
comment Do ちょうだい、ごらん、ください、おいで constitute an own class of part of speech?
It seemed to me like the OP already knew their meaning and was asking about their syntactic status in the language...
1d
comment “~において、…” vs. “~にとって、…” differences?
@user312440 「〜まして」 is fine. You should separate that into a different question so it doesn't muddle this one.
1d
comment How to say “had been [verbing]”?
@user312440 (1) There is no such thing as a "perfect tense". (2) Because syntax and semantics are so easily confused, statements like "Japanese has no future tense" are misleading for a lot of people. It is not difficult to construct sentences in Japanese which are semantically unambiguously referring to future events using modals and adjuncts. (3) Just because some grammatical element does not line up perfectly with a specific aspect or tense doesn't mean we should throw our hands up and give up trying to describe it -- thinking in such terms can still be quite useful.
1d
comment What “non-standard” katakana are commonly used?
Oh, they aren't officially considered "non-standard" I don't think. The scare quotes are still necessary upon first introduction of that terminology. I was just using "non-standard" to mean any katakana that don't have their corresponding hiragana in use (e.g., ふぁ、くぉ, and such are all very uncommon).
1d
comment Could ルフレ be considered a gender-neutral name?
Sounds gender-neutral to me. Maybe with a tiny slant towards female (just like "Robin" for me, really). I will let a Japanese person answer though.
1d
revised What “non-standard” katakana are commonly used?
Reword to not be a question looking for a resource, and try to narrow the scope a little
1d
comment How to say “had been [verbing]”?
「来ることを知っていたら、部屋を奇麗にした。」 seems a little unnatural to me... I would use 「来ると知っていたら、部屋をきれいにしたのに。」 or 「来ると知っていたら、部屋をきれいにしただろう。」 depending on what I was trying to say.
1d
reviewed Leave Open Could someone please clarify if I'm translating these two sentences correctly?
1d
reviewed Leave Open Does ところを always mean the same thing as のに? What is the difference between ところへ and ところに?
1d
comment What is the meaning of 座っておいで?
It's quite possible there are dialectical variations. Bullet two of @naruto's very thorough answer is the type of thing I was thinking of for "go" usages of it.
2d
revised What is the meaning of 座っておいで?
Fix typos
2d
comment What is the meaning of 座っておいで?
Also, this might just be my idiolect, but I think I'd use "come ~" with anyone I'm familiar with (e.g. "come help me set up this TV"), while I would not use 〜おいで with peers in Japanese.
2d
comment What is the meaning of 座っておいで?
Nice parallel. I think one difference is that you need to pick between "come" and "go" in English (e.g., "come dance with my friend John" only works if John is near you or you are going to move towards John, while "go dance with my friend John" only works if John isn't near you), while 〜おいで works for any direction.
2d
comment Do ちょうだい、ごらん、ください、おいで constitute an own class of part of speech?
Could you elaborate on why you think they seem to differ from subsidiary verbs?
2d
comment How to say “had been [verbing]”?
Just to make sure I understand correctly, did you mean "I will try translating a few sample sentences into English."?
2d
comment What is the meaning of 座っておいで?
@dainichi 「おいで」 is also a 補助動詞 (or acts like one, anyways). See meaning 二② bullet 2 of the 大辞林 entry
2d
comment Does ところを always mean the same thing as のに? What is the difference between ところへ and ところに?
I agree. I don't think it's a duplicate.