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bio website althack.org
location Cambridge, MA
age 22
visits member for 1 year, 8 months
seen 10 hours ago

Native English speaker, beginner in Japanese.

Interested in Japanese grammar & etymology.


18h
comment When should I use a verb stem by itself?
@Eric That 大辞泉 entry does still categorize it as a 終助詞 syntactically it seems. Though I'm not sure I agree with that -- I think it acts more like a 助動詞. For example, you can't use it with 形容詞の連用形, which is a typical behavior for a 助動詞.
21h
comment Only 〜ます in ending verb vs. 〜ませんでした
@herby Unpacking some of my points which help alleviate your confusion: (1) I don't think anyone thinks of です as a literal contraction of であります -- although that is (possibly) its etymology, it is treated completely differently; (2) I do not think anyone treats ませんでした as syntactically [○が○を○ませんでした]でした, but rather as a single unit ませんでした, where the でした is not acting as the copula but as a [+past] modifier of ません.
21h
comment Expressing concurrency
It might be worth mentioning that に伴い feels slightly more formal than に伴って or とともに (at least to me) exactly because it is using the 中止形.
21h
comment Only 〜ます in ending verb vs. 〜ませんでした
@herby From what I gathered from Dono's answer was "this is just how it happened", in that there were a number of competing choices of how to represent the "past polite negative", and we just happened to end up with 〜ませんでした, where 〜でした is not actually acting as the copula but instead just acting as a [+past] similar to how 〜です acts as [+polite] with i-adjectives (rather than as the copula). Of course take note that there is 〜なかったです, but it doesn't feel "as formal" as 〜ませんでした, probably due to the lack of 〜ます.
1d
comment When mixing Japanese and English, should I use Japanese parentheses?
@LeoKing If I had to guess, it's because this question is pretty opinion-based, and a downvote is sort of the main way to disagree with an opinion. It's such a simple answer that I can't see any other reason for it to be downvoted.
1d
awarded  Explainer
Sep
28
comment Difference between 日{に}本{ほん} and 来{らい}日{にち}
@ErnestasGruodis Google Translate is incredibly inaccurate, don't use it for looking up words (or anything at all, actually).
Sep
28
reviewed No Action Needed N + sou desu is acceptable
Sep
28
reviewed Approve suggested edit on How do I interpret the Japanese construction of verb+noun?
Sep
28
reviewed Approve suggested edit on How do I interpret the Japanese construction of verb+noun?
Sep
28
comment Noun+Adjective - What are the rules/usages?
Nice. It is interesting that these constructions do seem to be somewhat lexicalized, as evidenced by your usage of the older 終止形 inflection of some of them.
Sep
28
comment Meaning of 具体的に
@virmaior Seems accurate to me.
Sep
27
comment Meaning of 具体的に
I don't think 具体的に is considered a 副詞 (which is a word class in Japanese, not a description of how something is syntactically behaving). It is just considered the 連用形 of the 形容動詞.
Sep
27
comment Difference between 実は and 実に
Both answers are fine, but I have to say I'm a little confused that no one has opted to translate 実に as "truly", which seems like the obvious thing to do to me. :-)
Sep
26
comment Repeating subject for emphasis okay?
@snailboat Well, the OP did provide "bro", so while we could choose to ignore that, it's not like they didn't provide necessary context, I think. (It is at least pretty apparent to me the intended usage of "bro" there.)
Sep
26
comment Repeating subject for emphasis okay?
@Monburan It can be used in a friendly manner among closer friends, but when it's at the end of the sentence like that, it has the same flavor as "なんだよ、お前" or "何をしたんだよ、お前", which can of course still be said among friends but it's sort of a playful accusation in that case (IMO -- not a native speaker either :-).
Sep
26
comment Repeating subject for emphasis okay?
@Monburan Completely different meaning, really. Makes it sound accusatory.
Sep
25
comment after saying “ありがとう” to someone, they can't renege without hard feelings?
There's also stuff like ありがたく思う which you may also be interested in.
Sep
25
comment Using が multiple times in one sentence
✗誰にこれが好きですか?. And it's not just a syntactic restriction, as this is fine: ○誰にこれが必要ですか?
Sep
24
comment Using が multiple times in one sentence
Did you mean "the former one"? Also it's not possible to do this for all predicates.