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seen Sep 10 at 16:17

Mar
26
comment What is the English equivalent of the フヒヒヒ laugh?
Unless you are asking what nuance フヒヒヒ carries, this sounds more like a question about English, not about Japanese.
May
30
comment How to playfully scold someone?
I'd say "お前結婚式には呼ぶっていってたじゃんよ、奥さんに昔の恥ずかしい話をしてやろうと思ってたのに。恥を知れ(笑)" would be "Dude, you said you'll invite me to your wedding [but you didn't!]. I was so going to tell your bride about all the stupid things you've done before you met her [but because you didn't invite me, I couldn't!] Shame on you!"
May
29
comment Slang metaphorical animal names used to describe people
Added rubi as you suggest.
May
27
comment What is this person saying?
Given the additional context user3538 provided, が does sound like it's alluding to his additional thoughts. Since I didn't have that context, given this sentence alone I assumed that が throws "and how about you?" in the air, which I think could have been equally legitimate.
May
2
comment Using 着 Classifier
着 as counter is only applicable to cloths, I think. If you are counting the total number of arrivals of something, you'd be using the counter appropriate for that something, as in 便 for airlines and 本 for buses/trains, etc.
May
2
comment Using 着 Classifier
I'm afraid I don't understand what the English phrase "6 arrivals" means. Can you make an example sentence that's a bit longer?
May
2
comment Using 着 Classifier
Yes. You see this used a lot in a race.
Apr
29
comment How to playfully scold someone?
No, I didn't mean sarcastic. My bad if it comes across as such. I'm also surprised that my example paragraph was spot on!
Apr
17
comment Question regarding えば〜ほど
There's no れば part in that sentence, though.
Apr
13
comment Question regarding えば〜ほど
ビジネスマンのほど~ doesn't make sense to me, but if you find an example, please let me know.
Apr
13
comment Difference between 学生・生徒・児童
I second this. This should have been the accepted answer!
Apr
2
comment Why is topology called 位相幾何学?
A bit of googling reveals that there are other usages of the word 位相, such as this I'm curious where the word came from, too.
Mar
30
comment Alternate meaning of 見えない when used as an expression?
So you are saying neither feels like a good match. When I was playing video games back then, we often used 「見えない」 when you lost because the opponent was too fast (think of Street Fighter), or when the enemy was too numerous for you to manuever (think of this: wshin.com/images/games/dodonpachi/ddon03.gif). So perhaps that usage has evolved over a decade? What is the type of the game you are talking about?
Feb
12
comment Colour connotations in Japanese language?
OK, I guess I learn something new every day!
Feb
11
comment Difference between ささぐ and ささげる
I wasn't very clear, but "number of syllables matter a lot" refers to the use in lyrics alone. In written text it can be used without regard to syllables. For example, in a stele you would see ささぐ more commonly than ささげる
Feb
11
comment Colour connotations in Japanese language?
@user18597 I've never heard that the word 赤 originates from 明るい, and 明るい do not have any bareness/nakedness meaning. Do you have any sources?
Feb
11
comment Colour connotations in Japanese language?
@Dono I'm well aware that there are all sorts of meanings originated from the actual visual color (especially white). I didn't bother listing them as I wasn't sure what Koasamitsu really wants to know.
Feb
11
comment Colour connotations in Japanese language?
I've been reading this question many times over now, but I still don't understand what's being asked. A casual reading suggests you want "symbolic use of color in Japanese language" (what's "symbolic use"?), but then you say "separate from ... meaning derived from ... imagery", which seems like saying you don't want anything where the meaning originated in the actual color (say white=purity.) Even if such a word and meaning does exist, how does one prove that? Plus all your blue examples have their meanings rooted in the actual color. I'm confused!
Jan
10
comment Why is it (usually) wrong to say 人がある but OK to say ある人?
Indeed ある人 is 或る人 so as opposed to 有る so they really must have been two separate words to begin with. But are you sure 或る is not originated in Chinese?