233 reputation
18
bio website
location Israel
age 18
visits member for 1 year, 8 months
seen Aug 4 at 10:41

I'm a language-fanatic, an anime/manga fan, and an avid gamer.
Also, I'm super interested in programming languages and hope to someday make it my job.

I currently know/study:

  • Japanese (advanced level)
  • Korean (just started)
  • Hebrew (mother tongue)
  • English (judge for yourself)
  • PHP, HTML5 + CSS3, Java, Javascript, C#

I usually +1 everyone who comments/answers (unless I forget!) as I feel anyone who takes their time to answer a question deserves to be credited for it in some way.
Especially when they don't necessarily get paid for it.


Jul
2
awarded  Curious
Feb
3
accepted What are the usages of のだから?
Feb
3
comment What are the usages of のだから?
Hi William - Thanks for answering! Actually, I have been learning and improving since then and I now understand it the same way. I should have answered it for the sake of other people with the same question in mind, but I wasn't really active this whole time. Anyways - thanks!
Dec
12
awarded  Yearling
Feb
11
comment What does 母を恋はずや mean?
@Dono - Yes I've read it, and that's what got my confused in the first place. I thought こは was an old writing style and it grew to be わ... but from what I understand now, it was always わ, just written differently - am I right?
Feb
10
comment What does 母を恋はずや mean?
A little question, on wikipedia, the romanization is "Haha o kowazuya". Why is the は is pronounced as わ in kowazuya (according to wikipedia)?
Feb
9
comment Difference between the many words for son and daughter
お嬢さん, unlike 娘さん, can be used to also address strangers and is more honoring. I'd guess that you'd use お嬢さん to address someone's else's daughter if you're not as familiar with them.
Feb
9
comment Difference between the many words for son and daughter
According to the dictionary it is used more in situation (3) now days, but since one of it's meanings is a "geisha's (concubine's) husband" one should be really careful when using it. Another thing important of mentioning is that by itself (without a suffix), it may sound even rude. The full definition(s) can be found here.
Feb
9
comment Difference between the many words for son and daughter
@小太郎 - 娘さん and お嬢さん are both under situation (3), while 娘 may appear "as-is" (without a suffix) in situation (1). user1205935 - I'm not so sure about 旦那さん, but researching a little, I found that in the context of "husband" 旦那(さん) would be mainly categorized under situations (1) and (3) where I'm not so sure about (2)... I also read somewhere that this word, unlike 主人, doesn't convey any chauvinistic nuances (it is more informal as well).
Feb
9
awarded  Teacher
Feb
8
awarded  Custodian
Feb
8
reviewed Needs Improvement How should I bid farewell to a superior?
Feb
8
reviewed Satisfactory Difference in nuance between 頂ければと思います, 頂けませんか, and 頂きたいんですけども
Feb
8
answered Difference between the many words for son and daughter
Feb
4
comment Parsing a specific sentence from a book
@dainichi So how will the full sentence translate literally? "That blue line called the HP bar, is the result of the visualizing of my remaining life" perhaps? and snailplane - that's correct :)
Feb
4
comment Parsing a specific sentence from a book
Haha! Well, that's a funny way to put it, although this is from a book, I highly doubt they'd do something like this in books. I think it's there for explanation... thanks for commenting! :)
Feb
4
accepted Parsing a specific sentence from a book
Feb
4
comment Parsing a specific sentence from a book
As for 1, you're correct. 横線 was in fact introduced before in the context. Your translation makes sense as well. Thanks! :) As for 2, if もの is not the subject, what is?, as for the ~した part, in essence, it adds the nuance of "the result of...", right? I'd like to know more about it, and I will therefore open another question later today. Thank you! I appreciate your answer!
Feb
3
asked Parsing a specific sentence from a book
Jan
30
comment Particle を between nouns
I was on a mobile phone, and therefore limited in my ability to edit. Furthermore, how do you define a good question? My question is completely fine according to japanese.stackexchange.com/faq#dontask. What're you're suggesting is a great recipe for pure mess and in-organization, in my opinion. Plus, all of my recent questions are from a book I'm reading, and therefore, are in fact related. By the way, in the same way, I could essentially say your comments are off-topic, and therefore not "good enough", but I won't since I appreciate you and your honest critique. So thank you.