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Kids in rectangles irritating sick urchins rattling foxes, directory.kirisurf.org lol


Dec
29
comment When conjugating, is 'なる’ a potential verb, like '分かる'?
I think that the main reason with 分かる is to prevent confusion with the verb 別れる, which has the same root but has shifted in meaning.
Dec
25
revised is it aite or akete for open?
Rômazi
Dec
21
comment Why is “Yamata no Orochi” written in katakana?
I believe that the explanation might be that 1. Hiragana does not stand out from the particles and suffixes which all use hiragana 2. The demon name is remembered as a series of syllables, not as two words yamata-no orochi; the oral tradition thing may be relevant here - the katakana might emphasize that the name is this mysterious ancient series of sounds passed by tradition.
Dec
21
comment Haphazard usage of katakana and hiragana for particles and okurigana
Yeah, that's a possible explanation, but I would like it be an answer, possibly with sources or other texts that use ハ in an otherwise hiragana text.
Dec
20
comment Why is “Yamata no Orochi” written in katakana?
This seems to happen with animal and plant names too.
Dec
20
comment Haphazard usage of katakana and hiragana for particles and okurigana
Oh sorry. I still want an explanation of とハ though.
Dec
20
asked Haphazard usage of katakana and hiragana for particles and okurigana
Dec
17
comment PlaceにThingがあります vs ThingがPlaceにあります
It does mark case, thus, it is a case marker. It might be a suffix/clitic/particle/auxiliary/whatever, and that is subject to debate, but it does mark case.
Dec
17
comment PlaceにThingがあります vs ThingがPlaceにあります
I would phrase "are the children at school" as 子供たち**は**学校にいますか。. If the children are the children, they must already exist in the universe of discourse, and you are describing some already known noun. In this case the topical case should be used.
Dec
16
awarded  Nice Question
Dec
8
comment Why is [しゃべる」an intransitive verb?
I've always thought of accusative with "to speak" is a ridiculous Englishism (or IEism, whatever). Think about it. 日本語をしゃべる. I talk Japanese. Obviously I'm not doing anything to Japanese! In fact, the sentence "I speak Japanese" conjures up a picture in my brain of somebody opening his/her mouth, and out vomits pages upon pages of dictionaries, conjugation charts, etc. The Japanese language itself is being spoken! (No, you speak words, using the Japanese language)
Dec
7
comment 無い and 無く difference
No, but that's empirically how the 連体形 and 終止形 behave across "parts of speech" (i.e. 形容詞, 形容動詞, 動詞, 連体詞); I have also seen these terminology used for the slightly fusional (due to extensive sound mushing) Okinawan language, which doesn't really have "#段動詞" (very difficult to analyse as stem + separate suffixes); they are defined exactly in their semantic roles.
Dec
6
comment 無い and 無く difference
Similarily, something is in 終止形 if and only if semantically it is a finite verb.
Dec
6
comment 無い and 無く difference
@snailboat I would think that semantic function is much more important than arbitrary parts of speech. In thsi case, something is in 連体形 if and only if it is semantically a noun-modifier. End of story.
Dec
6
comment Is あれ? when used like 'huh/what?' contracted from something?
ありがとうございました!!!!
Dec
6
comment Casual speech particles in Classical Japanese
@ponyoky Classical Japanese refers to Japanese based upon the speech of the Heian period. Translating your Edo-period sentence to real CJ: ここはいづこなる?
Dec
5
comment Is あれ? when used like 'huh/what?' contracted from something?
Aside: how did you type the pitch accent?
Dec
5
comment Is あれ? when used like 'huh/what?' contracted from something?
@rintaun I pronounce both as aré.
Dec
4
comment Is あれ? when used like 'huh/what?' contracted from something?
What is "what?!?!" contracted from in English? Why do you think using "that?!?!" makes any less sense than "what?!?!"? Both seem to make zero logical sense; they are simply idiomatic expressions.
Dec
3
awarded  Yearling