1,358 reputation
521
bio website
location
age
visits member for 1 year, 7 months
seen 2 days ago

Kids in rectangles irritating sick urchins rattling foxes, directory.kirisurf.org lol


Jan
9
awarded  Custodian
Jan
9
reviewed Approve suggested edit on Is 君 (きみ) obsolete as a way to call your romantic partner?
Jan
8
awarded  Benefactor
Jan
8
accepted Accent changes in conjugation
Jan
6
comment Siri's pronunciation of ふ
I would say that ち naturally comes out as [tçi] though; i.e. t+ひ. Very close to the actual pronunciation anyways.
Jan
6
comment Siri's pronunciation of ふ
This is actually quite correct. Also, try to pronounce [si] with the very sharp Japanese /i/ and you get [ɕi] naturally. Even the weird [tsɯ] for /tɯ/ is reasonable; try pronouncing [tɯ] with the correct Japanese /ɯ/ and your tongue naturally articulates a very weak [s] sound as you release the [t]!
Jan
6
comment Siri's pronunciation of ふ
Our (very old) Japanese teacher is from 四国 and she pronounces ふ as [hɯ] quite clearly.
Jan
6
comment Twenty-two points of attack
I recommend translate.weblio.jp if you really want machine translation. It really understands the English sentence and outputs always correct (although sometimes it misunderstands the english) Japanese! WAAAAY better than Google Translate. It translates it into "攻撃の22ポイント" (kougeki-no nijūni pointo) which is quite correct although perhaps unidiomatic.
Jan
6
comment How to differentiate ~られる conjugation between passive form and potential form?
There is a way to contrast it if you are speaking with a casual Tokyo-dialect person! In casual speech, there is a form 食べれる that unambiguously means the potential, and never means the passive, which is always 食べられる. It such a shame it didn't make it into 標準語...
Jan
6
comment Twenty-two points of attack
I am amazed on how much effort you put into translating an abstract concept into a language you do not know!
Jan
6
comment Twenty-two points of attack
No offense, but translating word-for-word almost never works, especially translating a head-initial, verbose, analytic languages like English to a head-final, pro-drop, agglutinative languages like Japanese!
Jan
5
comment Accent changes in conjugation
Lol............
Jan
5
comment Accent changes in conjugation
@ZhenLin Many accent dictionaries seem to use HH..LL notation, probably as a compromise between the phonetic LHH...LL and phonemic downstep notation. So the transition point is the downstep.
Jan
5
comment Accent changes in conjugation
It was an edit by snailplane that did that. I used the downstep notation, which I much prefer for the Tokyo dialect (HL notation probably works better for Kansai etc) すごく is pronounce HHL in the middle of phrases and LHL in isolation.
Jan
4
awarded  Promoter
Jan
4
comment Why are the common strokes of these two characters written in different order?
Actually, in Chinese we write both of these characters the left-hand-side way; i.e. we write 生 as 牛 + one stroke at the end. At least I write it that way ;)
Jan
4
comment Accent changes in conjugation
I seem to not distinguish between the two types of accents in many cases (I am not native speaker). I would pronounce すごꜜかった but すごかꜜったので. I don't devoice す, it's followed by a voiced ご and I think it blocks devoicing, and in any case it sounds unnatural.
Jan
3
awarded  Altruist
Jan
3
comment When おばあさん is not really your grandmother
In Chinese, "that old grandmother" is used extremely generally to mean "that old woman". In fact, "that old woman" reeks of awkwardness and CSL.
Jan
3
comment When おばあさん is not really your grandmother
Chinese has an analogous usage of the word for "grandmother" (perhaps the Japanese calqued it from Chinese?); the "grandmother" is most likely with children simply due to age, but to me, a Mandarin native speaker, the question of whether the old woman has any children would not enter my mind at all.