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May
27
comment Are all 3 sentences the same?
@user1091534 Missing a を is not grammatically incorrect in this case. It is only normative not "correct", to always use を in written Japanese. This is from Meiji era to imitate languages like Latin where the case suffix cannot be separated from the noun. In fact, を was historically only used when particular emphasis on the direct object is needed. Also, "I were" is not "common". It's just a random brain fart or "speech typo", and any US speaker will feel weird listening to it clearly said. Missing を is like "I have" vs "I've".
May
27
awarded  Enlightened
May
27
awarded  Nice Answer
May
17
accepted Apparent reversals of conjugation patterns in classical 形容詞 and 動詞, origin?
May
14
comment Which words can be pronounced as either -aai or -awai?
Also, 具合わるい is a bad example since [ua] naturally glides to [uwa].
May
14
comment Which words can be pronounced as either -aai or -awai?
Yeah. That's what I meant.
May
14
comment Which words can be pronounced as either -aai or -awai?
Did the pronunciation of 河合 not come from 川{かわ} + 合{あ}い -> かわあい -> かわい?
May
10
awarded  Excavator
May
10
revised Historical differences between colors that are i-adjectives and those that are simply nouns
a*w*o is old, change other romaji wrt OJ/rkstkkndki
May
8
comment Apparent reversals of conjugation patterns in classical 形容詞 and 動詞, origin?
However, would it not be permissible to consider -k the ending for the stem of many adjective forms? Many adjective forms have -k- in them. In this case the vowel after it is comparable to the yodan vowel suffixes.
May
6
comment How to hear the difference between て and で, た and だ, か and が, etc.?
Distinguishing "spa" from "sba" requires distinguishing [p˭] and [b], which most Chinese people cannot.
May
6
comment How to hear the difference between て and で, た and だ, か and が, etc.?
On the other hand, /t/ and /d/ are distinct in Japanese, but /t/ and /tʰ/ (pinyin t and d) are not distinct, while they are distinct in Chinese. So わだし and わたし sound obviously distinct for Japanese speakers, while "哇大西" /watasi/ and "哇他西" /watʰasi/ are not distinct and are both わたし.
May
6
comment How to hear the difference between て and で, た and だ, か and が, etc.?
Chinese treats Japanese medial /t/ and /d/ and /p/ and /b/ as the same sound. That is, say, "哇大西" is either /watasji/ or /wadasji/ depending on speed/speaker/etc: Chinese doesn't care. (FYI Pinyin "t" is actually /tʰ/)
May
6
comment How to hear the difference between て and で, た and だ, か and が, etc.?
This is actually not a problem for English, since English strongly aspirates stops (/p/ sounds like /ph/, and /p/ and /b/ vs /ph/ is the distinction in Chinese), except after /s/. OP, if you think you speak English well, try distinguishing "spa" from "sba" (though sba isn't a word); if you can do that you have no problem with Japanese.
May
6
comment How to hear the difference between て and で, た and だ, か and が, etc.?
This answer is correct. As a Chinese speaker, I find it rather difficult to distinguish unaspirated /p/ with /b/, since they are in free variation in Chinese. That is, /p/ and /b/ are treated in the brain as the same sound, so when it gets to the brain's "understanding" phase they are already the same.
May
6
asked Apparent reversals of conjugation patterns in classical 形容詞 and 動詞, origin?
May
6
answered Why 罪人=犯罪者のこと、not just 犯罪者?
May
6
accepted Why is an anachronistic modern conjugation thrown into the lyrics of 軍艦行進曲?
May
5
comment Is there a “right” or “best” way to write this Okinawan expression for “cheers”?
Kanji and hiragana, written unphonetically according to Old Japanese roots/cognates, was in fact the official writing system for most of the Ryukyu Kingdom's duration. So calligraphy in Okinawan is generally in kanji and hiragana.
May
5
asked Why is an anachronistic modern conjugation thrown into the lyrics of 軍艦行進曲?