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Kids in rectangles irritating sick urchins rattling foxes, directory.kirisurf.org lol


Jun
3
answered Why doesn't Japanese have a special Katakana form for “hu”?
Jun
3
comment Is verb ending ない shortened to ん?
@EiríkrÚtlendi "A History of the Japanese Language" speculates something like 書きはない > 書きゃない > 書かない with the match with 未然形 being a coincidence. This of course happened far after なし became ない. I personally find this far-fetched...
May
31
comment Is verb ending ない shortened to ん?
@Sjiveru Of course that's the most obvious theory, but it's interesting that throughout Japan's history the location of the ぬ・へん vs なふ・ない division was so consistent. My point still stands that Kantō never used ぬ.
May
31
answered Do 形容詞 have a 未然形 in Classical Japanese?
May
31
comment What is the difference between 美しき and 麗しき?
Kansai still uses う rather than く for everything...like はよう for 早く in all contexts etc. Preserving く was a Kantō thing.
May
31
comment Is verb ending ない shortened to ん?
Also, Kansai still keeps the older ぬ, while already quite long ago Kantō started using ない. In fact Kantō never ever used ぬ as the negative: the classical one was なふ (conjugated as 四段, some believe ない came from the 連用形 of that). So it seems very likely ん is a (contraction of a) Kansai loan, and gets all the connotations Kansai loans get.
May
27
comment Use of です or あります in the sentence それは椅子
@Daniel が is the general nontopic (i.e. not は) subject marker. Chair is the subject, thus use が. は is incorrect since it is the topic marker. You cannot set the topic here, since it implies a chair already in the mind of the listener. 椅子はあります means something more like "The chair, it exists!" が "tones down" the 椅子 to make it refer to some generic chair "a chair" and focus the sentence on あります: you are not talking about the topic of The Chair, but the fact that a chair Exists. At least that's how I think of it.
May
27
comment Are all 3 sentences the same?
@user1091534 Missing a を is not grammatically incorrect in this case. It is only normative not "correct", to always use を in written Japanese. This is from Meiji era to imitate languages like Latin where the case suffix cannot be separated from the noun. In fact, を was historically only used when particular emphasis on the direct object is needed. Also, "I were" is not "common". It's just a random brain fart or "speech typo", and any US speaker will feel weird listening to it clearly said. Missing を is like "I have" vs "I've".
May
27
awarded  Enlightened
May
27
awarded  Nice Answer
May
17
accepted Apparent reversals of conjugation patterns in classical 形容詞 and 動詞, origin?
May
14
comment Which words can be pronounced as either -aai or -awai?
Also, 具合わるい is a bad example since [ua] naturally glides to [uwa].
May
14
comment Which words can be pronounced as either -aai or -awai?
Yeah. That's what I meant.
May
14
comment Which words can be pronounced as either -aai or -awai?
Did the pronunciation of 河合 not come from 川{かわ} + 合{あ}い -> かわあい -> かわい?
May
10
awarded  Excavator
May
10
revised Historical differences between colors that are i-adjectives and those that are simply nouns
a*w*o is old, change other romaji wrt OJ/rkstkkndki
May
8
comment Apparent reversals of conjugation patterns in classical 形容詞 and 動詞, origin?
However, would it not be permissible to consider -k the ending for the stem of many adjective forms? Many adjective forms have -k- in them. In this case the vowel after it is comparable to the yodan vowel suffixes.
May
6
comment How to hear the difference between て and で, た and だ, か and が, etc.?
Distinguishing "spa" from "sba" requires distinguishing [p˭] and [b], which most Chinese people cannot.
May
6
comment How to hear the difference between て and で, た and だ, か and が, etc.?
On the other hand, /t/ and /d/ are distinct in Japanese, but /t/ and /tʰ/ (pinyin t and d) are not distinct, while they are distinct in Chinese. So わだし and わたし sound obviously distinct for Japanese speakers, while "哇大西" /watasi/ and "哇他西" /watʰasi/ are not distinct and are both わたし.
May
6
comment How to hear the difference between て and で, た and だ, か and が, etc.?
Chinese treats Japanese medial /t/ and /d/ and /p/ and /b/ as the same sound. That is, say, "哇大西" is either /watasji/ or /wadasji/ depending on speed/speaker/etc: Chinese doesn't care. (FYI Pinyin "t" is actually /tʰ/)