5,527 reputation
11138
bio website kanjibox.net
location Kyoto
age 93
visits member for 2 years, 10 months
seen 2 days ago

Many years of living in Japan, none with formal Japanese-language classroom studying, mean I have:

  1. horrible grammar
  2. decent conversational level
  3. pretty good Sprachgefühl...

Gauge my contributions accordingly.


Dec
29
comment Can the term メリークリスマス be seen as politically incorrect?
@yadokari: I sense a lot of confusion (in that article and your approach) about what "religion" and "being a believer" entail... In Japan's case, obviously "believing in God" is an entirely unrelated concept. Accepting that Shintoism and Buddhism are religions, the quasi-totality of Japanese do follow rites tied to either one, at least occasionally (be it for wedding, funeral or new year celebrations). That makes them "religious" (if not in the way you would personally expect or define).
Dec
27
comment Can the term メリークリスマス be seen as politically incorrect?
Overall agreed, but you seem to be a little confused on the meaning of 'secular'. Having a small percentage of Christians does not make your nation secular. Having a strong separation of religious powers and government/laws, as Japan mostly does (if you don't look too long in the direction of the New Komeito), despite over 90% of its population declaring itself religious, does make it a secular nation.
Dec
3
comment の cannot be used as a pronoun meaning “one” for “highly abstract objects” but what is a “highly abstract object”?(amended)
@Tim: there's no way to "re-award" the bounty. If you want to do so, your only option is to open a bounty again and award it to your actual choice.
Nov
29
comment Kana to kanji mapping for a rōmaji keyboard
@Throwback1986: the FAQ (and guidelines) also clearly stipulates that it has to be connected to Japanese language and usage, which most of this question isn't (being about the technical aspect of building an IME is not the same as discussing the transliteration of a particular word, which is not even a very common type of question here).
Nov
29
comment Kana to kanji mapping for a rōmaji keyboard
PS: as it stands, your question is too broad and includes both topics that are marginally on-topic (kana-kanji relation) with others that resolutely aren't (use of statistical text processing to solve that problem, humongous UI and software engineering task of implementing a full IME tool...) Consider breaking it down and asking the relevant parts in the relevant channels (be aware that JLU does not consider software-specific questions, such as use of IME, to be within its scope).
Nov
29
comment Kana to kanji mapping for a rōmaji keyboard
Hello and welcome to JLU. This type of question (input tools, and even more specifically how to develop one) falls entirely outside of the scope of JLU and will be closed. You might want to consider asking it on more technical forums.
Nov
19
comment Situational acceptability of politeness and/or honorific use
@Andry already gave a very thorough answer, but I would pitch in my own anecdotal experience, which is that there is that 'relationship improvement' doesn't factor so much in the level of speech you use. There might be exception, but generally, no matter how long and friendly I'd know someone, I'll tend to stick to the same level of honorific.
Nov
15
comment Is 千{せん} a “current” number construct?
@dotnetN00b: that's where your non-statistician's mind fails you... ;-) In hypothesis-testing terms, the null hypothesis (what Ockham tends to prefer) is that there is no pattern. You are trying to invalidate that hypothesis by trying to show a pattern. However the amount of points fitting your pattern (3) is pretty low given the amount of outlier (1) created by your hypothesis, not to mention the fact that the null hypothesis offers the same fit (3 out of 4). Jokes aside 億 sounds a better candidate than 千 for being a recent creation...
Nov
14
comment Is 千{せん} a “current” number construct?
Interesting idea (no idea if it's grounded in truth). From a statistical standpoint, I would point out that, considering you conveniently remove the one number that does not fit the pattern, the "pattern" you are seeing is not very convincing, when compared to Ockham's preferred version of "there's a number for each multiple of 10, until it gets too big to really be a concern".
Nov
14
comment What is the longest word in Japanese?
Define "word" in Japanese. (good luck) Also: if katakana is allowed, I can generate "words" of pretty much any length you want. Take any technical English phrase (or even chemical compound name) with a use in Japanese, transliterate it and there you go.
Oct
26
comment What are some words with kanji/readings/meanings that don't match?
Although not a complete answer, this entry seems quite related to what you are looking for (along with some explanation of why such words exist): japanese.stackexchange.com/questions/6581/…
Oct
26
comment Does Japanese have morphemes that span two kanji?
To add to Ignacio's clear and concise answer: gikun are cases where the reading does not match particular kanji in the compound... and sometimes has more kanji than morphemes, implying that at least one morpheme would cover two kanji (although the common view is that there is simply no kanji<->morpheme connection for such compounds). I am less sold on 'reformed' words: even the example above doesn't really show two kanji for one morpheme (merely a blurry frontier).
Oct
17
comment Japanese small-talk
Sorry, but this question is way too open-ended as it is for JLU. I would suggest following the comment suggestions above and joining the Chat to practice your conversational skills.
Oct
16
comment Does “おつまみ” (otsumami) mean “snack” or “rice crackers” or “crunchy snack” like chips and peanuts, or something else entirely?
English has exactly the same word (with pretty much the same meaning): "finger food"
Sep
8
comment おっす! An abbreviation for … what exactly?
@user1205935 Thought I remembered something (might have been an oblique comment on another question). Best is to simply ask it officially if you want more details. The short of it is that there are a whole bunch of cases where おはよう[ございます] is used as a standard greeting, regardless of time of day.
Sep
8
comment おっす! An abbreviation for … what exactly?
@user1205935 I'd say it means exclusively おはようございます and could be used in same situations (albeit with different relationship/age implications). Keeping in mind that there are many cases where おはよう[ございます] can be used other than in the morning (I think there might even be a question about that somewhere).
Sep
8
comment おっす! An abbreviation for … what exactly?
おっす is between (mostly) young men and pretty much anywhere. I've heard and used it when getting to uni in the morning (including sometimes from females). It's basically a casual greeting and would sound appropriate for the situation described above.
Aug
31
comment “Sunday this week” or “Sunday next week”
Interesting information, but without context, it will be impossible to really make anything of it (especially in a couple months when people cannot easily figure on what day this question was asked).
Aug
24
comment Kanji for native Japanese concepts: Kun'yomi spanning multiple morphemes
Seems close enough to something that can be made as a community Wiki. I converted it: feel free to improve question and answer formatting.
Aug
24
comment What does「新聞っぽい曜日」mean? Newspaperish? Commonplace? Routine?
Isn't the answer simply in the context of that question?? The exercise wants you to identify which days come up more often in newspapers (hence "newspaperish"/"newspaper-like", whether that's a word or not) and which come up more often in romance novels. The 'っぽい' here seems to be a short way of saying "that are associated to the lexical field of"...