5,830 reputation
11345
bio website kanjibox.net
location Kyoto
age 94
visits member for 3 years, 5 months
seen Oct 21 at 2:24

Many years of living in Japan, none with formal Japanese-language classroom studying, mean I have:

  1. horrible grammar
  2. decent conversational level
  3. pretty good Sprachgefühl...

Gauge my contributions accordingly.


Dec
3
comment の cannot be used as a pronoun meaning “one” for “highly abstract objects” but what is a “highly abstract object”?(amended)
@Tim: there's no way to "re-award" the bounty. If you want to do so, your only option is to open a bounty again and award it to your actual choice.
Nov
29
comment Kana to kanji mapping for a rōmaji keyboard
@Throwback1986: the FAQ (and guidelines) also clearly stipulates that it has to be connected to Japanese language and usage, which most of this question isn't (being about the technical aspect of building an IME is not the same as discussing the transliteration of a particular word, which is not even a very common type of question here).
Nov
29
comment Kana to kanji mapping for a rōmaji keyboard
PS: as it stands, your question is too broad and includes both topics that are marginally on-topic (kana-kanji relation) with others that resolutely aren't (use of statistical text processing to solve that problem, humongous UI and software engineering task of implementing a full IME tool...) Consider breaking it down and asking the relevant parts in the relevant channels (be aware that JLU does not consider software-specific questions, such as use of IME, to be within its scope).
Nov
29
comment Kana to kanji mapping for a rōmaji keyboard
Hello and welcome to JLU. This type of question (input tools, and even more specifically how to develop one) falls entirely outside of the scope of JLU and will be closed. You might want to consider asking it on more technical forums.
Nov
25
revised Why does 「やきもち」 mean to be jealous?
Removed suspicious self-promoting link
Nov
24
answered Is しまった an appropriate translation for “Oops”?
Nov
19
comment Situational acceptability of politeness and/or honorific use
@Andry already gave a very thorough answer, but I would pitch in my own anecdotal experience, which is that there is that 'relationship improvement' doesn't factor so much in the level of speech you use. There might be exception, but generally, no matter how long and friendly I'd know someone, I'll tend to stick to the same level of honorific.
Nov
15
comment Is 千{せん} a “current” number construct?
@dotnetN00b: that's where your non-statistician's mind fails you... ;-) In hypothesis-testing terms, the null hypothesis (what Ockham tends to prefer) is that there is no pattern. You are trying to invalidate that hypothesis by trying to show a pattern. However the amount of points fitting your pattern (3) is pretty low given the amount of outlier (1) created by your hypothesis, not to mention the fact that the null hypothesis offers the same fit (3 out of 4). Jokes aside 億 sounds a better candidate than 千 for being a recent creation...
Nov
14
comment Is 千{せん} a “current” number construct?
Interesting idea (no idea if it's grounded in truth). From a statistical standpoint, I would point out that, considering you conveniently remove the one number that does not fit the pattern, the "pattern" you are seeing is not very convincing, when compared to Ockham's preferred version of "there's a number for each multiple of 10, until it gets too big to really be a concern".
Nov
14
comment What is the longest word in Japanese?
Define "word" in Japanese. (good luck) Also: if katakana is allowed, I can generate "words" of pretty much any length you want. Take any technical English phrase (or even chemical compound name) with a use in Japanese, transliterate it and there you go.
Oct
26
comment What are some words with kanji/readings/meanings that don't match?
Although not a complete answer, this entry seems quite related to what you are looking for (along with some explanation of why such words exist): japanese.stackexchange.com/questions/6581/…
Oct
26
comment Does Japanese have morphemes that span two kanji?
To add to Ignacio's clear and concise answer: gikun are cases where the reading does not match particular kanji in the compound... and sometimes has more kanji than morphemes, implying that at least one morpheme would cover two kanji (although the common view is that there is simply no kanji<->morpheme connection for such compounds). I am less sold on 'reformed' words: even the example above doesn't really show two kanji for one morpheme (merely a blurry frontier).
Oct
18
accepted Expressing: “Send them over/up, please”
Oct
17
comment Japanese small-talk
Sorry, but this question is way too open-ended as it is for JLU. I would suggest following the comment suggestions above and joining the Chat to practice your conversational skills.
Oct
17
revised Translating: “一人でも多くの方にコメントしていただけたら嬉しいので ”
edited title
Oct
17
asked Expressing: “Send them over/up, please”
Oct
16
comment Does “おつまみ” (otsumami) mean “snack” or “rice crackers” or “crunchy snack” like chips and peanuts, or something else entirely?
English has exactly the same word (with pretty much the same meaning): "finger food"
Oct
3
awarded  Nice Question
Sep
21
awarded  Custodian
Sep
8
comment おっす! An abbreviation for … what exactly?
@user1205935 Thought I remembered something (might have been an oblique comment on another question). Best is to simply ask it officially if you want more details. The short of it is that there are a whole bunch of cases where おはよう[ございます] is used as a standard greeting, regardless of time of day.