5,874 reputation
11343
bio website kanjibox.net
location Kyoto
age 94
visits member for 3 years, 2 months
seen 11 hours ago

Many years of living in Japan, none with formal Japanese-language classroom studying, mean I have:

  1. horrible grammar
  2. decent conversational level
  3. pretty good Sprachgefühl...

Gauge my contributions accordingly.


Jun
17
suggested suggested edit on Is there a logic for deciding when to employ furigana?
Jun
17
comment Is there a logic for deciding when to employ furigana?
@Dave: I reiterate. While I agree that without sources, it isn't very productive to throw hypotheses around on house style and private guidelines. There are clear, universal, and possibly legally-backed guidelines for newspapers and magazines. It would take somebody much more versed in Japanese law than me to find an acceptable reference, but Jp Wikipedia on 常用漢字 or this page sound like good places to start.
Jun
17
comment Giving something to oneself
your 1. makes perfect sense (and is basically the regular usage of 自分, as I understand it) but it's also the opposite of what @Pacerier initially stated... So either there is a major typo in Pacerier's question, or I'm still confused on what is what...
Jun
17
comment When should one add さん at the end of a name?
Although this is veering into intermediate/expert level (and possibly more cultural than language) issues, 'dropping the -san when referring to yourself' also extends to the notion of social groups. For example when mentioning a close family member to a stranger, or a coworker to a client etc.
Jun
17
comment How important is one's pitch when speaking Japanese?
@Derek: yes, but going by that reasoning, you could answer absolutely every "is X important in Japanese" by "Yes". I think @Axioplase and @Tsuyoshi both have a point in that 1) there is no such thing as a universal word pitch in Japanese (most words vary across regions) 2) Japanese will understand you regardless. I have yet to see somebody, no matter how off their tonic accent/pitch (or even how rudimentary their accent) be misunderstood by a Japanese. Compared to other languages, pitch just isn't that important in Japanese.
Jun
17
comment Giving something to oneself
I am with @Tsuyoshi on the weirdness of the question. It could be that @Pacerier wants info on reflexive sentences (give to oneself), but in that case, some serious rewording would help. Also, can somebody explain to me why "自分に何をあげる" would be grammatically wrong? It seems alright to me (if possibly not very meaningful in Japanese)
Jun
16
comment Is there a logic for deciding when to employ furigana?
@derek: on second thought, this question would indeed be better suited for meta. But personally I think we should let it fly, on account of being a really nice question (if bordering on the off-scope) and the low volume of questions on the site at the moment.
Jun
16
revised Is there a logic for deciding when to employ furigana?
emphasis for clarity; added 7 characters in body
Jun
16
comment Is there a logic for deciding when to employ furigana?
@Dave, re. "there is absolutely no system at all": as I pointed in my answer above, this is not entirely true. While novels and comics might have arbitrary/in-house rules, I am pretty certain at least newspapers have to conform to strict rules (if not laws) regarding out-of-jouyou kanji use (and addition of furigana).
Jun
16
revised Is there a logic for deciding when to employ furigana?
better separation of the two cases (adult vs. younger public); deleted 5 characters in body; added 5 characters in body; added 3 characters in body
Jun
16
revised Is there a logic for deciding when to employ furigana?
added 136 characters in body; deleted 6 characters in body
Jun
16
answered Is there a logic for deciding when to employ furigana?
Jun
16
awarded  Nice Answer
Jun
16
comment How important is one's pitch when speaking Japanese?
Hello @Axioplase and welcome to j.SE! Two small things 1) SE has a hard time dealing with UTF8 URLs (for now). If you can't avoid UTF8, it's recommended you use the 'link' button, which will automatically convert the UTF8 to percent-escaped format. 2) When replying to a question where a question has already been 'accepted' (the green checkmark on the left), it is recommended you make sure you are bringing a sufficiently new point to warrant a new answer. If you just want to bring a small precision, commenting on the answer is a better way... どうぞ宜しくね!
Jun
16
comment Nuances between the different kanji spellings of あける:明ける vs. 開ける vs. 空ける
Woa thanks for all the details! That's exactly the type of answer I was looking for... So, the take-away-message would be that, for practical purposes, these are indeed 3 different words with no sense overlap whatsoever, correct?
Jun
16
accepted Nuances between the different kanji spellings of あける:明ける vs. 開ける vs. 空ける
Jun
16
revised Nuances between the different kanji spellings of あける:明ける vs. 開ける vs. 空ける
added 4 characters in body; added 13 characters in body; deleted 5 characters in body
Jun
16
comment Nuances between the different kanji spellings of あける:明ける vs. 開ける vs. 空ける
@repecmps: you missed the important part of that sentence, which comes after: "has to do", not "is limited to". By stating this first, I was trying to limit the frame of the question (I stand by my "obvious" because we all know that these kanji have a certain association with some of the senses). Once again, the fact that a reference says one thing, while I (and many others) think otherwise, makes it perfectly on-topic to me. You may think that this question is trivial and I sincerely invite you to post an answer with proper reference :-)
Jun
16
revised Nuances between the different kanji spellings of あける:明ける vs. 開ける vs. 空ける
added 1 characters in body
Jun
16
comment Nuances between the different kanji spellings of あける:明ける vs. 開ける vs. 空ける
@Mark: actually, my bad: I used the wrong name and should have written JMDict all along, as this is the proper name (and what I've been using). Per their documentation, EDICT is no longer maintained as such, but automatically generated from JMDict...