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Jun
21
comment Would the plain form of a verb usually be translated as future tense?
I think an important part of the ambiguity here, is the verb used: 見る. By definition, it tends to be a "progressive" action (especially with a film) and a progressive form ("見ている") would be used in most cases to refer to an ongoing action. The plain form is therefore statistically more likely to be a future action. I don't think this would be true of any verbal form (e.g. 好きです).
Jun
21
answered Appropriate ただいま-like greeting for a neighbor?
Jun
20
accepted When is 酒【さけ】used to mean 日本酒【にほんしゅ】?
Jun
20
answered “Statistically speaking … ”
Jun
20
comment What is the etymological connection between sake (alcohol) and sha-ke (salmon)?
Indeed (we posted simultaneously and I only saw your answer after posting mine). As you point out, though, any connection would be in the opposite direction...
Jun
20
revised What is the etymological connection between sake (alcohol) and sha-ke (salmon)?
typo
Jun
20
answered What is the etymological connection between sake (alcohol) and sha-ke (salmon)?
Jun
20
answered Verb classifications by japanese learners
Jun
19
comment Was the name for the Shōwa era a voluntary pun?
Actually, Wikipedia does offer an explanation for the change: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/… (essentially: they resented the "bending down" implication of the kanji)
Jun
19
comment Was the name for the Shōwa era a voluntary pun?
Yes. The previous kanji was 倭 and it is described at length on both Japanese and English versions of the Wikipedia page for Wa (I have edited my post to add it and fix the broken UTF8 link. I was hoping to find back some article I remember reading about the (cultural/political) implications of either kanji, but can't get my hand back on it. From memory, 倭 had a certain implication of "barbarians", or some equally condescending view of the Japanese by the Chinese, hence the change.
Jun
19
revised Was the name for the Shōwa era a voluntary pun?
Fixed link and added kanji
Jun
19
revised Was the name for the Shōwa era a voluntary pun?
deleted 4 characters in body
Jun
19
answered Was the name for the Shōwa era a voluntary pun?
Jun
19
revised What is the difference in meaning between “husband and wife” 夫婦【ふうふ】 and 夫妻【ふさい】?
edited title
Jun
18
comment Are there any Japanese words as versatile as “fuck” in English?
Despite the (admittedly poor) wording of the title, this CW is not about translations for the word 'fuck', but about finding expletives/interjections of similar versatility.
Jun
18
revised When is 酒【さけ】used to mean 日本酒【にほんしゅ】?
added 147 characters in body
Jun
18
comment When is 酒【さけ】used to mean 日本酒【にほんしゅ】?
No worries... Don't hesitate to edit your answer to make it more fitting to the question. But for example, you say to you "お酒を飲みましょう" implies 日本酒, but I think in a lot of cases if I said that to friends, they would understand it as "let's go drink (anything)", not particularly sake. Also, could it be that the use of お酒 instead of just 酒 makes it more likely to be 日本酒?
Jun
18
comment When is 酒【さけ】used to mean 日本酒【にほんしゅ】?
thanks for your answer! but I am afraid you are missing the main point of my question. I know that [お]酒 is a very common word in modern Japanese: I use it all the time ;-) I was referring to the particular use of "酒" when meaning specifically "fermented rice wine" (otherwise known as 日本酒)... For example, I am not sure I would be well understood if, when prompted by a waiter at my local izakaya for my order, I just said "酒"...
Jun
18
revised When is 酒【さけ】used to mean 日本酒【にほんしゅ】?
deleted 2 characters in body
Jun
18
asked When is 酒【さけ】used to mean 日本酒【にほんしゅ】?