Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams

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visits member for 2 years, 10 months
seen Apr 16 at 14:33

Sep
19
comment Why is だ used for な adjectives?
「な」=「にある」, 「だ」=「である」.
Sep
17
comment 「たくさん」 is technically, but not practically, a na-nominal (形容動詞) , right?
I always heard it was an adverb...
Aug
29
comment When and where did 丁寧語 emerge?
I heard that 丁寧語 was derived/adopted from 江戸弁.
Aug
22
comment What's the equivalent to densha, futsuu, tokkyuu, and kyuukou in the West?
It seems a bit of a false comparison to try to align a single transit system (or single set of systems) against the rest of the world's...
Aug
22
comment Use of は with 自分 in a subordinate clause
I've felt it easier to think of 「自分」 as being equivalent to English's "one", the indefinite third-person pronoun.
Aug
16
comment であります compared to でいます
Remember that there are two 「ある」s: existence (「在る」) and possession (「有る」). They sound the same, but are distinct.
Jul
2
comment Difference between に and で。
Compare it to "to" vs. "by".
Jun
11
comment Kanji and meaning behind Shikifuton?
Did you mean 「[敷布団]{しきぶとん}」?
Jun
4
comment What are these suggestions in hiragana typing?
What did EDICT have to say about them?
May
31
awarded  Yearling
May
30
answered What's the substitute word for missing/unimportant part of sentence?
Jan
7
answered Usage of noun-modifying である
Dec
25
comment What is the function of と in とある?
In short, it's the adverb particle.
Dec
23
answered AはB emphasizing B, rather than A
Dec
7
awarded  Popular Question
Nov
8
awarded  Popular Question
Oct
26
comment What are some words with kanji/readings/meanings that don't match?
You should clarify that you're not actually looking for gikun or ateji.
Oct
25
answered Does Japanese have morphemes that span two kanji?
Oct
20
comment Problems with particles
It's not so much a special usage of 「~ください」 but rather that 「ください」 is the imperative form of 「くださる」.
Oct
20
comment Problems with particles
「ね」 and 「か」 are sentence terminal particles. You want them to give you the shirt, so the shirt is the object of the sentence.