363 reputation
110
bio website stuartwoodward.com
location Yokosuka-shi, Japan
age 46
visits member for 2 years, 10 months
seen Mar 18 at 1:13
Englishman living and working in Japan since 1988

Jun
28
revised What is the most natural way to refer to someone when you don't know their name and don't have a close relationship with them?
に->で
Jun
7
awarded  Yearling
Jan
29
comment The meaning of ~のみ
I used to get coffee at the same shop every day and used to ask for "ミルクだけ。" when asked whether I wanted milk and sugar, the lady behind the counter always used to confirm, "ミルクのみ?". Thinking that I had missed something in understanding the difference, I started to say, "ミルクのみ。" to which she replied, "ミルクだけ?"...
Jan
29
comment In customer settings, is it ok to ask for keigo to be repeated in more “normal” Japanese?
Since you are a foreigner in this situation, I don't think there is a right or wrong. It is a situation not in the "rule book". You could ask for them to speak more simply and this would usually result in something more understandable for the beginner. Someone once told me, "If you have trouble understanding someone, it is likely that Japanese people have the same problem too." People with good communication skills can always get the message across.
Jan
29
comment What are common mistakes made by Japanese kombini employees speaking “manual keigo” (バイト敬語)
I think you have coined (no pun intended) an Oyaji-gag rather than pointed out a grammatical error.
Jan
14
suggested suggested edit on What's bugging the Japanese language?
Jan
12
awarded  Commentator
Jan
12
comment Should I speak in the local dialect and/or accent of an area?
Yes. Actually there is the heavy Okinawa dialect of Japanese and also the Okinawa language ウチナグチ 沖縄口 which is very close to Japanese but sufficiently different to be incomprehensible. The Okinawan language supplies many local words to the dialect.
Jan
10
awarded  Announcer
Jan
9
answered Should I speak in the local dialect and/or accent of an area?
Jan
9
comment What to say after someone sneezes
"大丈夫?", "風邪引いたの?", "花粉症なの?" all are very feminine and would probably sound like you were paying too much attention to the other person if you were not in a close relationship with them.
Jan
2
awarded  Editor
Jan
2
revised Is it appropriate to use [先生]{せんせい} when addressing a ski instructor?
Added furigana.
Jan
2
suggested suggested edit on Is it appropriate to use [先生]{せんせい} when addressing a ski instructor?
Jan
1
awarded  Announcer
Jan
1
comment Why is gaikokujin more politically correct than gaijin?
@sawa I would take it to mean food that is served at TGIF or similar Western Chain restaurants.
Jan
1
comment Since Japanese already had several words for rice why was “ライス” (raisu) borrowed from English?
Japanese has way more words for "landslide" than for "rice". Look them up sometime and meditate on them if you live at the top or the bottom of a slope.
Jan
1
comment Why is gaikokujin more politically correct than gaijin?
@sawa many foreigners use gaijin in causal way. i.e. "I need to eat some gaijin food tonight..". Said jokingly.
Jan
1
comment Why is gaikokujin more politically correct than gaijin?
Imagine if you gained Japanese Citizenship, you would no longer be a 外国人 but on first appearances you would still be a 外人 to most people. However, if your Japanese is so good, your Japanese friends may forget, and even comment, that you are not like a 外人 whether you are 外国人 or not.
Dec
17
awarded  Critic