674 reputation
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bio website twitter.com/onteria_
location Southern California
age
visits member for 3 years, 6 months
seen Jun 16 '11 at 11:33

Mainly dable in web programming including PHP and JavaScript. Know a bit of C and Java. Unfortunately has experience in making IE play nice.

Other hobbies include studying Japanese and reading lots of non-programming books.

My twitter feed is in Japanese. You have been warned if you attempt to visit.

I blog about node.js and sometimes other things. You can check me out at

http://onteria.wordpress.com/


Jun
15
comment What is the meaning and etymology of 蝶よ花よ?
@Tsuyoshi I was able to get ahold of a faculty member from the university of hawaii that specializes in East Asian languages. He agrees that the Makura no Sōshi theory does not seem to hold. Instead he believes that the origin is potentially from Chinese, but needs to consult some references before giving anything definitive. It looks like another commenter has already looked in the Kōjien(広辞苑), and as they noted the 夏祭浪花鑑 reference which was already mentioned (though worded a bit differently) is listed.
Jun
8
comment What is the difference between 出来る限り and 出来るだけ?
@Derek I'd agree with you in the case of projects under deadlines, but if I'm writing a hobby project the triad doesn't matter much. Yes, I'd like to hear a native speaker weight in as well. My point was much to the fact of 「出来る限り」 showing utmost effort, so the listener is going to think you're very serious about the result. Whereas 「出来るだけ」 has more of a "I'll do what I can" feeling, and the listener could potentially feel that you're not giving your all, and might not put effort into the process of producing the result.
Jun
8
comment What is the difference between 出来る限り and 出来るだけ?
@Derek I actually stand on that, given the phrase 「出来るだけ完成形に近づけるように頑張ります。」. If for example it's a piece of software, I might cut corners to get things done faster, and not write quality code.
Jun
8
comment Does the (USA) English metaphor “Unable to see the forest for the trees” keep its meaning if translated verbatim into Japanese?
@Jeshii 「木を見て森を見ず」, though I can't say definitively if that will be understood by a native Japanese speaker as the same meaning
Jun
8
comment Does the (USA) English metaphor “Unable to see the forest for the trees” keep its meaning if translated verbatim into Japanese?
The non-verbatim translation for those curious: 「彼は細部[ささいなこと]にこだわって大局を見ていない。」 Source: eow.alc.co.jp/see+forest+trees/UTF-8/?ref=sa
Jun
8
comment What is the meaning and etymology of 蝶よ花よ?
@Tsuyoshi I've updated again with a more plausible explanation with origins to a regional wedding song. This song also appears to be in other cities as well. I'm also waiting on Kōjien(広辞苑) to arrive in case it has any other information on it.
Jun
8
comment What is the meaning and etymology of 蝶よ花よ?
@Tsuyoshi I'm still researching, but I did notice a page that connected this phrase with 月よ星よ, which looking at the definition it matches more closely, and the format is very similar. Still trying to connect how one lead to the other though.
Jun
7
comment What is the meaning and etymology of 蝶よ花よ?
@Tsuyoshi I'm still searching on the official source for this, or the Makura no Sōshi theory. I've already reached out to some faculty members that specialize in East Asian languages to see what I can come up with. Once I find something from an authoritative source, I will update accordingly. For now I will leave this answer here in the event that it helps someone else find an authoritative answer.
Jun
7
comment In modern usage how do Japanese natives regard the differences between 外人, 外国人 and 外人さん?
As an addition, 「海外人」 is sometimes used