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seen Aug 29 at 4:12

Jun
19
comment why use という in this sentence
I disagree with the four closevotes here. という is very subtle, and hasn't really been explained very well in the other threads.
Jun
16
comment Usage of Particle Ni
Some verbs take を, some take に. That's not a satisfying answer, but it's probably the most honest. 負ける pretty much always takes に, whereas the meaning of 出る changes depending on which particle it takes, for example.
Jun
4
comment What does おめでとう煜ございます mean?
If you're looking for 'sense', I should point out that the way young Japanese people type online often doesn't make sense either. It doesn't surprise me in the slightest to see bananas, stars, rabbits and playing card suits punctuating conversations. Think of them as a sort of meme, in the original sense of the word.
May
14
comment への対へ/に-Difference between への and へ/に
If you like - I was simply drawing a distinction between "an utterance that felt incomplete" and "an utterance that felt complete". That is, あなたへの私の愛 is not trying to be a sentence, but あなたに私の愛 is trying to be a sentence (and is failing). I suppose you said it better. ;)
May
14
comment Questions with some usages of で
で, in all of these circumstances, feels to me like the て form of the copula. I'm sure a grammar book would do a better job of telling you what that is than I would, but yes, all of the で sound the same to me.
May
14
comment Why is 〜に受かる used to mean “to pass”?
(There's also the use of に as marking a cause (e.g. 暑さに音を上げたのは人間だけでない, it's not only humans who suffered from the heat - taken from Kaiser et al's "Japanese - a comprehensive grammar"). I doubt this too though, but this is purely my intuition.)
May
14
comment Why is 〜に受かる used to mean “to pass”?
It's difficult to answer questions like "why is it に?". (Perhaps it just is, and there's no reason Japanese case particles should be explicable within an English frame of mind.) Grammatically, it's に simply because 落ちる is intransitive. Be careful with the literal meaning: 恋に落ちる means "to fall in love", and 地面に落ちる means "to fall onto the ground". If you want to think of it as "falling onto a test", feel free, but my guess is that this is not how Japanese people think of it.
Feb
9
comment What is the English equivalent of「ひとこと欄」?
I guess just "comment box"? It's worth pointing out that 欄 is a pretty common word for text fields (e.g. in browsers), like 名前欄 (box into which you put your name). I saw someone refer to some box on Twitter as 「お気に入り」欄 ('favourites' section). The Facebook status update box is 近況欄.
Feb
9
comment What does ドン引き mean?
Even if you can't read Japanese well, my dictionary gives "talking or acting in such a way as to make those around you draw away". WWWJDIC says "drawing away from someone because of their speech or actions; having the mood ruined". It gives an example sentence, in which ドン引き is translated as "you creeper!". Seems clear to me.
Dec
22
comment What does “クズな” mean?
Google shows lots of results for both 屑な and クズな. Is it possible that the word has only recently become popular as a な-adjective?
Dec
19
comment Double subject construction?
Thanks very much, @snailplane (and dainichi). I'll accept this answer simply because it's a bit more detailed than Flaw's. :)
Dec
19
comment Double subject construction?
Thanks - appreciated. :)
Dec
19
comment Double subject construction?
Oh - perhaps the name is more transparent than it seemed at first glance. The "exclusive-listing" meaning of が is the one that renders "YがX" as meaning "the (only) thing with property X (in the world / in consideration / in the scope of this discussion) is Y", is that right?
Dec
19
comment Double subject construction?
Can you explain exactly what you mean by "exclusive-listing", please? (I could perhaps reverse-engineer a definition from your XのはY sentences, but I'm wondering what it means in general, without reference to this double-が nonsense.)
Dec
18
comment Double subject construction?
@istrasci Oh, I didn't know HTML was allowed here. Thanks.
Dec
18
comment Double subject construction?
So can I say 郊外が家賃が安い? (That is, can I change the subject?)
Dec
18
comment Double subject construction?
Ack, my formatting messed up. I don't really know how to fix that, because it looks fine on the edit screen...
Dec
16
comment Is みんな being used as a “counter”?
@Tim: Is it possible that you just misunderstood the meaning of cypher's second sentence? The 皆 there is 'referring to' the cheese, not people. I think you wanted to write 皆が, not 皆に.
Dec
16
comment Is みんな being used as a “counter”?
I think the point is just that みんな can be used either as a noun or as an adverb/counter-type thing. (Just like すべて, which can be both of these things.)
Dec
5
comment How to call a wait pointer in Japanese?
I've certainly never heard of either "wait pointer" or "wait cursor" in English, and I consider myself very computer-literate, so I'm inclined to believe it's not very popular except amongst people who have read that documentation. (More flippantly, but equally sincerely, I imagine that in practice the Japanese at least use the same sort of language we do to describe it, such as "beach ball of death" or "oh for ****'s sake that stupid ******* egg timer ******* again".)