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seen Sep 28 at 23:08

Jun
14
comment A Deeper Look Unto て, で and は
@CraftRiot My understanding has always been that the particle で came from にて, but that, at least in modern Japanese, copula だ has te-form で as well. They happen to look alike, and were derived from the same places; but nowadays they're not the same.
Aug
2
comment The で particle before です
Yes, you can say 「バスでです」, meaning approximately "(it is) by bus". That phrase alone has a lot of google results: the first one on my computer says 「東京まで一番安くいけるのはバスでですか?」, and I think you would lose some naturality if you omitted で there.「なんでですか?」 is fairly common in general. Also, fluency in a language doesn't necessarily enable you to teach it to non-native speakers.
Aug
2
comment Difference between ために and ように
@istrasci If you know that I'm right, then post it as an answer. I am very unsure.
Jul
31
comment Difference between ために and ように
My non-native intuition says this. In the sentence "Aよう・ためにB", ように is used when the speaker means that B should entail or ensure A, and ために is used when the speaker means that B happens with the intention of A happening. In other words, in your first sentence, the speaker is implying "going to bed early ensured that I would definitely not miss my plane", and in the second, "I raised my hand with the intention of asking a question". The first sentence implies that the speaker was not late for the plane. The second sentence doesn't imply that the speaker managed to ask a question.
Jul
25
comment What is the か in「か弱い」?
Thanks for your answer. :)
Jul
23
comment What is the か in「か弱い」?
Yes, they were all unjustified and unreferenced, so I didn't bother to include links.
Jul
23
comment What is the か in「か弱い」?
I suspect the 小 theory is nonsense too, but it's among the more believable theories I found! か黒い is new to me. Thanks.
Jul
22
comment Particle for “in the water”
However, to be useful to DaleyPaley: I'm sure what dainichi was hinting at was that this particle is a particle demanded by 行く, rather than a particle that means "in the water". Actually, my best attempt at a translation (bearing in mind that I might have misunderstood this) would be "rise through the water", not "in". If anything means "in" at all, it is probably 中.
Jul
22
comment Particle for “in the water”
I don't understand the closevote. I also don't understand @dainichi's link. It's obvious what 道を行く is meant to mean, but it's not at all obvious to me what 水の中を上って行け is meant to mean. I think this is a good question.
Jul
21
comment What's the difference between 済む, 終わる, 出来る and 上がる
I doubt it. Perhaps you could talk about a long drought that had now finally 済んだ, in the sense of "let up", but I'm not sure. Summer and puberty could perhaps 済む, if you considered them as processes that had many goals to achieve (and finally achieved them before ending), but it sounds somewhat mechanical to me. You might have to ask a native speaker.
Jul
20
comment why use という in this sentence
"Please note that in informal English, the equivalent of the Japanese って is often the use of the physical gesture of "air quotes."" I like this explanation. I would say the same was true of という too, to some extent, with the caveat that "air quotes" give very informal English, whereas という and sometimes even って are perfectly acceptable in more high-register Japanese.
Jul
20
comment Which of the phrases included here is the best translation for “It's truly painful to think I might have caused you pain”?
@oldergod Is that really in keeping with the tone that mia is trying to portray? I'd find that very rude unless it came from a friend about something quite minor.
Jul
20
comment Why are Japanese song lyrics often so seemingly ungrammatical?
(It helps if you're very thorough and careful with your grammar. 青さを知る doesn't mean "knowing that it is blue", it means "being/becoming familiar with its blueness", for example. That is not the state of being blue, but the quality of its blueness.)
Jul
20
comment Why are Japanese song lyrics often so seemingly ungrammatical?
"Why are Japanese song lyrics often so seemingly ungrammatical?" Probably because - with respect - your Japanese grammar is somehow lacking. (Don't take this the wrong way - so is mine!) Song lyrics, in English as well as in Japanese, include both formal and colloquial expressions, half-finished thoughts, poetic constructions, old-fashioned and modern slang, dialect, grammatically acceptable but nonsensical stories, native-speaker-level 'errors', and so on. Figuring out what's what is of course a very difficult task for a non-native speaker.
Jul
15
comment Usage of どういう意味
Compare: 科学の意味 (the meaning of science), 科学という意味 (the meaning 'science' / it means 'science'). 何の意味 usually means "what's the meaning in it?" (何の意味がある? what's the point?) or comes with も+negative (何の意味もない it's meaningless).
Jul
6
comment Why don't radicals have the same definition for all kanji?
Kanji radicals are not supposed to help you study the kanji. No one invented them in order to be helpful to you. They are a little chaotic - the whole Japanese writing system has developed chaotically. This site gives you the etymology of most kanji: kanjinetworks.com/index.cfm
Jul
6
comment What is the English equivalent of an 意匠ノート?
I get the feeling it may mean something more like cute / stylish / chic / designer notebook.
Jun
28
comment What's the difference between がんばれ and 頑張って 【がんばって】?
I don't know why this answer was downvoted, especially without comment, as Craig is clearly a new user...
Jun
26
comment What does さすがお尻マイスター mean?
It doesn't sound like it means anything sensible to me - it's probably an 'in joke'.
Jun
24
comment Are 短(い) and 身近(い・な) related?
My guess is that it's coincidence. 身近 is probably spelt with a ぢ - 近 is ちか, and the ち undergoes 連濁.