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Dec
19
comment Double subject construction?
Oh - perhaps the name is more transparent than it seemed at first glance. The "exclusive-listing" meaning of が is the one that renders "YがX" as meaning "the (only) thing with property X (in the world / in consideration / in the scope of this discussion) is Y", is that right?
Dec
19
comment Double subject construction?
Can you explain exactly what you mean by "exclusive-listing", please? (I could perhaps reverse-engineer a definition from your XのはY sentences, but I'm wondering what it means in general, without reference to this double-が nonsense.)
Dec
18
comment Double subject construction?
@istrasci Oh, I didn't know HTML was allowed here. Thanks.
Dec
18
comment Double subject construction?
So can I say 郊外が家賃が安い? (That is, can I change the subject?)
Dec
18
comment Double subject construction?
Ack, my formatting messed up. I don't really know how to fix that, because it looks fine on the edit screen...
Dec
18
asked Double subject construction?
Dec
17
answered I am confused about the meaning of the conjugations of [買]{か}う
Dec
16
comment Is みんな being used as a “counter”?
@Tim: Is it possible that you just misunderstood the meaning of cypher's second sentence? The 皆 there is 'referring to' the cheese, not people. I think you wanted to write 皆が, not 皆に.
Dec
16
comment Is みんな being used as a “counter”?
I think the point is just that みんな can be used either as a noun or as an adverb/counter-type thing. (Just like すべて, which can be both of these things.)
Dec
5
comment How to call a wait pointer in Japanese?
I've certainly never heard of either "wait pointer" or "wait cursor" in English, and I consider myself very computer-literate, so I'm inclined to believe it's not very popular except amongst people who have read that documentation. (More flippantly, but equally sincerely, I imagine that in practice the Japanese at least use the same sort of language we do to describe it, such as "beach ball of death" or "oh for ****'s sake that stupid ******* egg timer ******* again".)
Nov
27
comment i-adjectives used as na-adjectives: is there a difference? (e.g. 大きい versus 大きな)
I suspect your question 2 can't be answered, and this is just a small list of exceptions (unless you want a historical reason why they accidentally arose as exceptions). As for the difference in use: it seems to me that 大きい is the declarative adjective (e.g. その建物は大きい(です)ね!, but not * その建物は大きだ(/です)ね!), and 大きな is preferred as an attributive adjective (e.g. それは大きな建物ですね is preferred over それは大きい建物ですね).
Nov
24
comment Is しまった an appropriate translation for “Oops”?
@silvermaple: Sure, that kind of thing. Doesn't really feel appropriate for "oops!" here. :)
Nov
23
comment Is しまった an appropriate translation for “Oops”?
I always understood しまった as meaning something more like "damn!", but milder. How about おっと?
Nov
21
comment Which forms of a verb do I need to memorize to distinguish ichidan from godan?
@cypher: 要る・入る, but 居る, is another common one. (To be precise - because it's obvious to me what you mean, but not necessarily to others: whether it's an ichidan or a godan verb doesn't "depend on the kanji" as such. Rather, whether it's an ichidan or a godan verb depends on the meaning of the verb, and the kanji used depends on the meaning of the verb. So of course you can work out whether it's ichidan or godan depending on the kanji, but there's no direct relation between how you write a given word and how you conjugate it. They both come from another source.)
Nov
21
comment Typo or am I missing something? 「ドイツ語も勉強しないとですね。」
@Maccath: In particular, while と can sometimes mean 'if', it's the wrong kind of 'if' to make sense here. と is never used in this sense. My intuition on this is fairly weak, but I think "if you're not learning German" would be something like 「ドイツ語を勉強しない のなら 」. Similar sorts of things are expressed by しなかったら and しなければ, but they sound a little odd to me here.
Nov
21
comment Insertion of “y” sound between vowels
@alexandrec: To be honest, I find your answer harder to understand - not least because I wouldn't expect to find a glottal stop before words starting with e and o in English. I'm not sure I know of a dialect that reliably does that, and it mostly comes down to how careful the speaker is.
Nov
17
comment a natural and short way to say I'm currently learning Japanese, and it isn't very good?
I'd definitely recommend polite form and no slang, as in istrasci's post. Plain form and slang come across as rather blunt (rather than e.g. friendly, which you might have been intending). You'll find some Japanese people using plain forms and slang, but not all, and you should assume that they know better - polite form, even online, especially amongst people you don't know, is always safe, whereas plain form is a bit more subtle.
Nov
15
comment Etymology of それはそうと
@istrasci: But と is never used to mean that sort of (conjunctive) 'and'.
Oct
30
comment Is 感じる {かんじる} transitive or intransitive? Which particle to use?
My intuition aligns with istrasci's. If you feel a certain way, you should use an adverb (i.e. い-adjective modified to end in ~く, or な-adjective with に plonked on the end). An example of this: 「体がすごく重く感じるよ!」 (stolen from alc). If you feel (aka sense) an object, then you should use a noun with を.
Oct
30
comment Do people use まい?
@TsuyoshiIto Your translation sounds the same as ssb's translation to me (though ssb's is a little more colloquial). (The "like" in ssb's sentence and the "as if" in yours don't have the same meaning, if that's the source of your confusion?)