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visits member for 1 years, 7 months
seen Dec 23 '13 at 3:29

Dec
21
awarded  Commentator
Dec
21
comment Haphazard usage of katakana and hiragana for particles and okurigana
おくのほそ道 (Oku no Hosomichi) does that as well: archive.wul.waseda.ac.jp/kosho/he05/he05_00917/he05_00917.html
Dec
20
comment Haphazard usage of katakana and hiragana for particles and okurigana
I might be wrong about this but I think that using ハ as the particle was the preferred way back then.
Jan
16
awarded  Nice Question
Dec
5
accepted Can 猿 technically mean “ape”?
Dec
4
comment Can 猿 technically mean “ape”?
I did not mean to dismiss your answer. The anecdotal evidence is just my justification for asking for a bit more information on the topic and why I feel the way people usually translate 'ape' might not be conclusive because it does not necessarily follow scientific accuracy (as it does not in my native Portuguese). Also, please note that I do not claim to be an expert. My field was actually behavioral psychology (never actually graduated in that), which meant understanding some anthropology. In hindsight, my comment about that was unnecessary and derailing. I apologize.
Dec
3
comment -たい words and a student's confusion
You might want to check this, it'll probably clarify a little bit more on how this stuff works: guidetojapanese.org/learn/grammar/desire
Dec
1
comment Can 猿 technically mean “ape”?
I'm not sure that's conclusive. Both those books' titles are translated in my native language with the word "macaco" (monkey), but "macaco" is not an accepted term to refer to them in technical writing. I have in fact read Morris' book (I studied behavioral psychology at uni), and iirc, the word 'macaco' is only ever used in the title itself to refer to apes, with the more correct word 'primata' being used in the book itself. I could elaborate more on this and why I suppose that is, but unfortunately there's a character limit (and would be kinda off-topic).
Dec
1
awarded  Editor
Dec
1
revised Can 猿 technically mean “ape”?
added 12 characters in body
Dec
1
asked Can 猿 technically mean “ape”?
Nov
17
comment Does an international OR standardized phonetic alphabet/notation system exist to depict all the Hiragana/Katakana sounds?
@damx I'm not the most knowledgeable person out there, but I think it might clear up a bit if you do a bit of reading on phonetics (wikipedia would probably be enough).
Nov
9
comment Does an international OR standardized phonetic alphabet/notation system exist to depict all the Hiragana/Katakana sounds?
Just to clarify, you CAN describe how a word sounds in the IPA so that anyone can know how to read it. But it only works with that, words (there are exceptions, though). You can't create a comparison table and just substitute the kana for the equivalent IPA symbol.
Nov
9
comment Does an international OR standardized phonetic alphabet/notation system exist to depict all the Hiragana/Katakana sounds?
The problem with this is that the kana don't always have the same sound. The IPA is meant to describe phonetics, not as a transliteration table between scripts. For instance, ん has as much as FOUR different phonetic representations in IPA, depending on how it is pronounced.
Oct
19
answered Greeting a person over the internet
Sep
17
comment What does 逃げっこなしにしよう mean?
Oh, I got it now, thanks a lot!
Sep
17
awarded  Scholar
Sep
17
accepted What does 逃げっこなしにしよう mean?
Sep
17
comment What does 逃げっこなしにしよう mean?
Oh, I see! That's A LOT clearer now. I'm still not sure about the にしよう part, though.
Sep
17
awarded  Supporter