566 reputation
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bio website okomestudio.net
location San Francisco, CA
age
visits member for 1 year, 7 months
seen Mar 21 at 18:46

I've been programming on and off for quite some time. Started with BASIC with assembly on 8-bit machine (called MSX...). Then I moved on to Perl, C++, C, and finally Python. Now I work in science and do programming for scientific data analysis. I occasionally help people with Japanese since, well, I am Japanese. How I wish I could go back to Japan!!

I am available for freelance work in software programming (using Python/SciPy/NumPy/Matplotlib and C/C++ for low level stuff) and English-Japanese translation, as well as other engagements if they are actually interesting.


Oct
25
comment Help with a usage of 自慢
@yadokari There are a whole bunch. I don't think 自慢 isn't that special in that regard. お気に入り, 誇り, 秘密, to name a few...
Oct
25
comment How do these 3 ways of saying “It can't be helped” differ?
I think they are the words with multiple meanings (though not wildly different), some overlapping. When used in the same context, they all mean the same thing.
Oct
24
comment Help with a usage of 自慢
But that structure I used in my previous comment is essentially what you came up in the 美人妻 example. So you had it right there.
Oct
24
comment Help with a usage of 自慢
@yadokari Oh, I see. I think I'm starting to see where your confusion really comes from. If I were to use の, then I would use 彼は私の自慢だ, in the same way that you might say キティーちゃんは、私のお気に入りだ. Does that make things clearer?
Oct
24
comment Help with a usage of 自慢
@yadokari No, I didn't mean that it's wrong or overly awkward. I guess I just tried to mention that 自慢 has a connotation that may be slightly different from "being proud of." I know that your first examples are quite often used, but I felt it can be confusing because of the way sentence is structured. For example 私は彼が自慢だ can be rephrased as 私の自慢は、彼だ and suddenly it is not so confusing (though I would argue the latter is structurally cleaner yet it doesn't sound so common).
Oct
23
comment How do I say “the reason why” or “the purpose of” in Japanese?
@Tim Yeah, 読むことが趣味だった? or 読むことが好きだった? would also work.
Oct
23
comment How do I say “the reason why” or “the purpose of” in Japanese?
Oh, I see. That may make more sense. The difference between as and for translates to 趣味として読書をする vs. 趣味のために読書をする.
Oct
22
comment How do I say “the reason why” or “the purpose of” in Japanese?
@Tim I'll try giving my answer below. As you say, literal translation can simply use 〜のために but then it does sound like the sentence came out of a textbook.
Oct
22
comment How do I say “the reason why” or “the purpose of” in Japanese?
@Tim I didn't mean to say what you suggested was wrong. I was just referring to the specific example, and just telling how I just feel by reading that sentence. 本当にただ〜をしていただけなのに is a sort of idiomatic expression that can be used to convey the feeling that I described in my previous comment. I might try answering the OP's question in the answer section...
Oct
22
comment How do I say “before” or “used to” in Japanese?
The first example and explanation are fine and I agree, but I don't understand the last one. 好きじゃいバンド does not make sense at all. かつて or かつては could be used to mean in the past but I think the usage is more common in writing, not when speaking. And may sound a bit awkward to use it in the OP's context anyways.
Oct
22
comment How do I say “the reason why” or “the purpose of” in Japanese?
「本当にただ本を読んでいたのに、楽しかった。」sounds to me more like "I was just reading books, but it was fun" implying that it was rather unexpected that such a simple act as reading books could be fun. It also depends on the context, which is lacking here.
Oct
22
comment 微温い versus 温い versus ぬくい versus ぬるい
I cannot say with certainty if ぬくい is a dialect. However you cannot rule out the possibility that the word usage have slowly diffused into other parts of Japan. People are moving around these days. I am from Saitama, so I am most familiar with 標準語, and ぬくとい definitely sounds like it is a 方言.
Oct
22
comment 微温い versus 温い versus ぬくい versus ぬるい
You might be right, but isn't that what makes a dialect? The variation due to geographic separation?
Oct
21
comment Polite form of ~っけ
I'm rediscovering Japanese these days so learn as much from responding to these questions. I struggled learning English, so I have a great respect for those who study a foreign language as deeply as you guys do here.
Oct
20
comment 生け花をします does it mean to practice flower arranging?
Oh you didn't have to add that to your response which was totally fine. 〜分 means a portion good enough for a certain duration, e.g., 一週間分の食料 means food enough to last for a week. So 今夜分の練習 kinda means nightly practice. But 今夜の練習 is perfectly fine and may sound even more natural since it's succinct.
Oct
20
comment 生け花をします does it mean to practice flower arranging?
I think I now see what the confusion in the original post, and both sound fine to me. You could potentially make things more explicit by saying 今夜分の生け花の練習 for example, but the gist of the original question was about the ambiguity of します.
Oct
20
comment 生け花をします does it mean to practice flower arranging?
I guess I'm failing to understand your point, but the conversation between X and Y appears fine to me. What is the confusion? Practicing 生け花 can mean both improving skills (i.e., 練習{れんしゅう}) and just the state of being familiar with it.
Oct
20
comment Polite form of ~っけ
@By137 It kinda got long so I also edited my response below. I'm in no way an expert of 敬語, but I hope I'm adding something useful.
Oct
20
comment Polite form of ~っけ
@By137 Now that you've edited the question I'm not sure exactly what you are asking. Do you wish to know a politer expression for each of the above cases? Before the editing it sounded as if you wanted something generic enough but still polite to replace っけ. For the new examples you listed, the first four can be considered somewhat casual depending on the context and how you actually say it (does the sentence end with the intonation going up or down? That sort of thing).
Oct
19
comment Function of the first の in とかの他の
The reason is that の is very useful and there are a number of ways it can be used to connect things, making it very easy to overuse. I must admit I'm very guilty of constructing sentences with too many の myself, especially when I hastily write/say something just to make a point. And on the web, many people are just trying to communicate, not trying to write beautiful Japanese sentences. They do convey meaning perfectly; it just sound awkward in formal writings. The Japanese aren't good at saying (English) "No" explicitly in negotiations, but they do use の a lot in their language.