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The Portuguese Language proposal on Area 51 could use your support. Anyone interested in the Portuguese language can follow the proposal here.

Also, the Latin Language proposal is in definition phase. Anyone interested in the Latin language can follow the proposal here.


Nov
15
comment Scope of negation with 〜したくない
@TsuyoshiIto Ok, thank you for your comments.
Nov
15
comment Scope of negation with 〜したくない
@TsuyoshiIto Maybe in practice, but isn't しないでほしい at least a stronger way of saying WANT(NOT(you do x))? It's conceivable that the weaker NOT(WANT(you do x)) just gets interpreted to mean WANT(NOT(you do x)), because しないでほしい would be too strong of an expression. Like you say そうでもない, because いいえ is usually to strong of an expression, but そうでもない (="not exactly like that"?) usually gets interpreted to mean "no".
Nov
14
comment Scope of negation with 〜したくない
@Sjiveru That was my point. ほしい makes the distinction between "not wanting (so.) to" and "wanting (so.) to not" clear. For 何もしたくない, there isn't really a counterpart.
Nov
14
comment Scope of negation with 〜したくない
I think this distinction works very well with ほしい: 何もしないでほしい vs. 何もしてほしくない. But I think that 何もしたくない would in fact more likely be "I lack the desire to do anything".
Nov
14
comment をも… what on earth this particle combination?
Speaking of を+another particle. Is をは ever acceptable? I've never seen or heard it and the "rule" I know is that は absorbs を, just like も is supposed to absorb を, but then of course it doesn't always... Oh, and of course が+も=も, at least according to the "usual rule". So, is がも ever acceptable?
Nov
14
comment ても “even if/though” doesn't seem right
I'd say that も is more an "as much as" rather than an "also". I think of the も in the "even though" pattern as the latter も. The も here really pairs with こんなに・そんなに・あんなに (e.g. あんなに頑張ってても、全然できてないよね。"He's working that hard, but he really doesn't get it.").
Nov
12
comment What is the difference between Okaa-san/Onee-san/Ojii-san and Kaa-san/Nee-san/Jii-san
@TsuyoshiIto Thinking more about it, I agree that neither 父さん nor お父さん are particularly formal, but quite the opposite. In any formal context "father" would be 父{ちち} or 父親. Curious that a polite and formal version doesn't really exist any longer (unless you want to sound like a warrior and use 父上).
Nov
12
comment What is the difference between Okaa-san/Onee-san/Ojii-san and Kaa-san/Nee-san/Jii-san
@TsuyoshiIto Maybe formality necessitates politeness, so that "formal" is redundant? (2) Personally, I use ワープロローマ字, but I think in my romanization attempt, I correctly used the convention of traditional Hepburn romanization, but I'll switch to modified Hepburn. (3) Added お兄さん, because you asked for it ;)
Nov
7
comment Ordering a drink, conversational Japanese
I wouldn't say that あの or ちょっと is particularly polite.
Nov
5
comment What is the etymology of べき? How should I visualize it?
@user54609 I didn't know anything about the inflections of 形容詞 in Classical Japanese. After looking them up just now, I agree that べきだ seems to be the only form that seems to contradict the usual rules.
Nov
3
comment What is the etymology of べき? How should I visualize it?
Thank you for your comment. So べき is the 連体形 and べく is the 連用形... That's confusing, esp. since べき is used like a noun (e.g. べきだ) and could be the 連用形 of a verb "べく", whereas some inflections look similar to those of a verb (e.g. べからず). I guess I know too little about Classical Japanese to make sufficient sense of it.
Nov
3
comment What is the etymology of べき? How should I visualize it?
Was the 連体形 used as abstract noun in Classical Japanese in more generality than in Modern Japanese (e.g. 締切り, やりとり, 申し込み, etc.)?
Nov
3
comment What is the etymology of べき? How should I visualize it?
That said, reasonableness of the question could be improved. @Nathan What do you mean by "visualize" the etymology? Do you expect any etymology to be pictorial or do you want just an easy-to-remember picture-to-word association?
Nov
3
comment What is the etymology of べき? How should I visualize it?
@TokyoNagoya I think what to learn is everyone's own choice. If etymology is really useless for learning a particular expression (and sometimes it is useless, although often it can be helpful), then any motivated student would realize that learning about such etymology didn't help him/her much in deepening his/her understanding of the (modern) language. In that sense, I think that any reasonable question about the language deserves an answer, no matter who asked. Asking the right kind of questions is after all part of the learning process.
Nov
2
comment the difference between 世界 and 世
What do you mean by "why they don't just say"? Why would the default choice for "world" be 世界?
Nov
2
comment What's the difference between 生む and 産む?
There are also the nouns 出生 & 出産, which both mean "birth" in some sense.
Nov
2
comment What's the grammar behind お忘れなきよう?
@Kaz The verb stem functions as noun, which can then be prefixed with the honorific お. no-ga conversion makes お忘れ が ないように into お忘れのないように. This is (now) the standard way to make a request into a polite request.
Nov
1
comment 名前, does it have English Roots?
@TsuyoshiIto Fair enough. To me it's still not clear whether citing 設定 and "set" is enough to point out the flaw in the OP's reasoning, unless the OP agrees that they are that similar in pronunciation (at which point he could ask, whether 設定 indeed has its roots in the English word "set").
Nov
1
comment 名前, does it have English Roots?
We have "comments are not for answers", but I think we should also have a "answers are not for comments". I don't think this really answers the question, but rather questions the question in a roundabout way. Moreover, your answer seems to suggest that any cognate should be false. Like たばこ would be a false cognate of "tobacco".
Oct
31
comment かわいい meaning care for
The kanji in 可愛い mean "lovable", but they are 当て字. Etymologically, かわいい is said to stem from 顔映し, which means something like "radiant face".