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Mar
17
comment How else can you use 「だい」as in 大好き or 大嫌い?
As the の already suggests, 大の can only be used with nouns.
Mar
17
comment Unusual usage of 勝 (勝たしてくれ?)
I had written up an answer like this, but was unsure because Wiktionary lists 勝たす as a variant causative form and the other answer claims that 勝たす is a "rougher variant". I thought that 勝たして was just the result of a sound change せ to し, but realised that I don't know any formal rule for forming the causative form.
Mar
16
comment Struggling to translate parts of this particular sentence.
I think that when ~てきた is used metaphorically, it is usually written in all 仮名, but when it is used literally (as in this case), it is usually written with 漢字.
Mar
16
comment Struggling to translate parts of this particular sentence.
@Mononoke ~てきた is used both metaphorically and literally. In this case, it is used literally and 借りて来た means "I borrowed and came", i.e. "borrowed before I came", or here "I rented a phone at Narita Airport that works overseas (before I came here), so there's no problem."
Mar
16
comment Unusual usage of 勝 (勝たしてくれ?)
On the first page of search results for 勝たす, I find this Wiktionary entry. Where did you look for 勝たす? (Conventional dictionaries usually don't list all inflections of a verb. I doubt OED has an entry for "to let so. win" or "won".)
Mar
16
comment Struggling to translate parts of this particular sentence.
Why did you translate 問題がない to "I had a problem"?
Mar
14
comment Why is the volitional form used in this title 「時には自分を疑おう」?
Why do you say the meaning is surely not "let's doubt ourselves"?
Mar
14
comment Using declarative だ with negative i-adjectives
Sure, but the question body said "should I omit it?", so I chose to use the same language.
Mar
13
comment “Seemingly cute” - かわいい + 〜そう
@hippietrail I don't think so. ~そう expresses a feeling you get about something and this answer says that this feeling should not be "actual information" or an obvious fact. But this feeling needn't be visual, so blind people can very well use ~そう, e.g. being described an X, they might respond 良さそうですね "Seems/sounds like a good X" (where X can be anything). (Or all of this can happen over the phone, where it's irrelevant, whether someone is blind or not.)
Mar
13
comment Confusion about 一千億 and 一千兆
Numbers aren't that difficult to learn, you just have to remember 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 100, 1000, 10,000, 100,000,000, 1,000,000,000,000, etc. As it stands, the app only serves to help learn these fifteen numbers and eight exceptions, which are 300, 600, 800, 1000, 3000, 8000, 100,000,000 and 1,000,000,000. Adding counters, the app might be of value not only to complete beginners, but to learners at practically all stages.
Mar
13
comment Confusion about 一千億 and 一千兆
I'm afraid that "digit" means something else: 10,000,000 is a number, (in base ten) written using one instance of the digit "1" and seven instances of the digit "0". I'm not sure what difference you're trying to capture, but "digit" is the wrong word. In English you can also say "a hundred" or "one hundred", but as far as I know, they are completely interchangeable.
Mar
13
comment Is there a Japanese equivalent of knock-knock jokes?
@TokyoNagoya Why don't you post another answer? I guess なぞかけ is similar to knock-knock jokes (and the play on words I mentioned in my answer) in that なぞかけ seems to use homophones for the joke. (I think I've even played this before.) What's different is that it requires some serious puzzle solving abilities of the 2nd person (unless the pattern is "その心は" "分からない" "[答え]").
Mar
12
comment How would I say “Courageous warriors called Samurai?”
It's not so much that I didn't want to help you a second time, but I answer questions in my free time and sometimes I run out of free time. I had imagined "Courageous warriors called Samurai" was some sort of slogan (maybe for a poster) that you wanted translated. For such a slogan 「侍という勇気のある戦士」 fits well in my opinion. The comments seem to suggest that you don't want a slogan, but a full sentence. A full sentence may appear in all sorts of contexts, so you'll have to provide the context to get the best answer. You can either try to edit your original question, or ask a new question.
Mar
11
comment How would I say “Courageous warriors called Samurai?”
It would have been easier if you had asked your full question from the beginning.
Mar
11
comment How to understand “きざみ角煮{かくに}”
Do you still have a question? Do you want to write up an answer yourself?
Mar
7
comment Is there a Japanese equivalent of knock-knock jokes?
@Tek I don't think the OP is asking if he can tell a knock-knock joke in Japanese and expect laughter, but rather asking if there exist simple jokes following a particular pattern.
Mar
5
comment Using も in place of を
For と you can say AとBを食べた; for も every item in the list needs it.
Mar
4
comment Why sometimes people change the way they say 明日 from あした to みょうにち or あす when confirming a reservation day over the phone?
possible duplicate of 明日:あす & あした;Is there a difference in meaning and when each is used?
Mar
3
comment Decomposition of kanji
Everyone thinks about kanji of being made up from several components, but I've never come across a systematic way to decompose a kanji into its parts. It seems like Unicode has enough types to describe where the (unique type of) radical occurs. Maybe that's why there are only 12 types.
Mar
3
comment Decomposition of kanji
@ssb Fine, but I guess it's likely that a kanji exists, which has a "top, bottom left, bottom right" (or similar) decomposition, where the bottom two characters don't form a character.