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location New York, United States
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visits member for 2 years
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Took Japanese on and off through college (2 years of classwork total). Studied abroad at Kanazawa Institute of Technology for one summer. Anime and video game enthusiast. Always interested in polishing my skills. My greatest sources of practice these days are watching anime and playing Japan exclusive video games. Right now I have a goal to read a Japanese 17 x 11 book cover to cover.

大学の時日本語を断続的に勉強しました。ある夏金沢工業大学で留学しました。アニメやビデオゲームや興味があります。いつも技能を磨きたいんです。主な練習の仕方はアニメを見たり日本語のビデオゲームをしたりすることです。 今私の目標は日本語の新書を読むことです。


May
14
comment Japanese without Kanji
In my own personal opinion, kanji isn't a matter of difficult, so much as it is, they just take a lot of work to memorize. I find it much more difficult to read when a sentence is written without kanji, because it's hard to tell where one word ends and where another begins--or even if a set of characters is a word at all.
May
14
comment Can the volitional form be used when the speaker is not intending to do the action themselves?
I want to say yes, as I've definitely heard the volitional form used in this way before. But I'll just leave this as a comment since I can't cite any examples to corroborate my claim.
May
12
comment Difference between ~そう and ~見える when saying “how something looks” / “what something looks like”
@Chocolateさん へぇ、エッチ?そのリンクSFWなのか?w
May
12
comment Difference between ~そう and ~見える when saying “how something looks” / “what something looks like”
I haven't heard anything like 大きそう before. Most often I hear it expressed as 大きいみたい.
Apr
6
awarded  Nice Question
Dec
16
comment What does りょう mean in かいしゃのりょう?
This is just another example of why sentences in all hiragana are harder to understand than if they used kanji.
Dec
16
comment Is 君 (きみ) obsolete as a way to call your romantic partner?
I've heard it in anime as recent as 2010, but I've only heard the man call the woman 君.
Dec
14
comment Who's Who (Giving/Recieving Structures)
下さる is the extremely humble version of くれる。 Usually not used in normal speech.
Dec
14
comment Who's Who (Giving/Recieving Structures)
くれる isn't only used when someone gives something to you. It's more of a "giving down". Someone of higher "status" gives to someone of lower "status", or alternatively, someone close to the speaker is being given something. My first thought when reading this (and I could be wrong) is that Ted-san's son is close to the speaker.
Oct
19
comment 童貞が許されるのは小学生までだよね - translation of まで
I'm not entirely confident, but it appears to be saying "They can only be virgins up to middle school".
Oct
19
comment What does this sentence mean? These katakana are confusing me
Hyperworm took the words right out of my mouth.
Oct
17
revised Meaning of trailing の in a question
edited tags
Oct
17
comment Japanese language “compression ratio”
I'd like to make a speculation. I think how long it ends up being depends on the type of speech/writing. I've noticed that speech/writing that's very expository tends to consist of mostly kanji, so it becomes shorter than its English equivalent (in terms of number of characters and overall space it takes up on the page). On the other hand, more expressive speech/writing tends to have more hiragana and katakana because of all the particles, adverbs, and interjections, so it comes out longer than the English equivalent.
Oct
16
comment Japanese language “compression ratio”
@istrasci I don't think this should be closed as off topic. There could very well be answers that aren't speculative. I find it hard to believe that there is absolutely no hard data on this subject.
Oct
16
comment What's with this “On reading”/“Kun reading” thing? Is it important to learn both as a beginner?
@Aerovistae I know I'm late to the party, so you've probably learned this by now, but the different readings don't correspond to different meanings. There's no 100% reliable way to predict which reading will be used in which compound. It's all just a matter of memorization.
Oct
16
comment What is the literal meaning of 'マスコミにバラして'?
Can you provide the context that you saw/heard this? Was it from a manga? Was it on a television show? What was the surrounding context of the conversation when this was said? In general, Japanese is a very context dependent language, so it never hurts to give as much background as you can.
Oct
15
reviewed Reviewed need help understanding a coin
Oct
14
awarded  Custodian
Oct
14
reviewed Reviewed Where to find a list of all syllables
Oct
13
comment Native speakers (basically) don't study radicals. So, how could they be useful for learning kanji?
@無色受想行識 jisho.org/kanji/details/%E5%A4%82