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comment How do I turn this into “will” form?
@Rilakkuma: That is an interesting suggestion for what could be a good discussion: I am not sure I agree with you. Things may have changed but when I reflect on when I started Japanese, I feel the teaching of " the normal language as spoken" put too much emphasis on what not to say. Examples need to reflect what learners will hear. Apart from anything else, it maximises passive learning.
Aug
19
comment ら抜き言葉: Why doesn't 忘れれれば exist?
I just chanced upon this paper in English. It gives a summary of how ra-nuki kotoba (with academic references) are used on pages 13-15. lup.lub.lu.se/luur/… For me the most interesting part of this discussion is how some of us probably have not been conjugating the potential form with the conditional form correctly, even for everyday verbs (bad learning? / bad habit? / not commonly used?/ in reality such expressions such as 「食べらればよい」 get used anyway?)
Aug
16
comment Is “フリーマーケット” sometimes assumed to be derived from “Free”?
@EiríkrÚtlendi: I was a bit quick and it was not really part of the OP's question so I removed it. Thanks.
Aug
16
comment つー事 as a sentence starter
This is not a complete duplicate. つーことは is colloquialism for ということは, which is often taught as set expression in itself, similar to つまり.
Aug
13
comment つー事 as a sentence starter
Silly question but should the「 ー 」used above, and in the other examples from before, always be read as ひと?
Aug
10
comment Ways to express prohibitions
Welcome to JLSE. Can you make your question clearer? Also, you may need to be more focussed. If your question was "Please teach me all the different ways to express prohibitions in Japanese?" then you might do better to look at a text book first, then come back with questions.
Aug
10
comment How to properly pronounce コップ?
This is confusing. My dictionaries tell me that コップ is a glass, a glass is コップ or グラス, and a mug is a マグ.
Aug
9
comment Which is more natural: イエス様の救う恵み or 救うイエス様の恵み?
I had a Christian upbringing but it is only occasions like this I think about the varied meanings of words like grace, redeem, charity etc.
Aug
9
comment Which is more natural: イエス様の救う恵み or 救うイエス様の恵み?
@virmaior : It is a while since I read it but you might find the following interesting: youtube.com/watch?v=CRXKM2tGGnY
Aug
8
comment Which is more natural: イエス様の救う恵み or 救うイエス様の恵み?
If this is what the priest will say in church giving a sermon then I expect this is the answer the OP is looking for but what do they use in the Bible, if that book contains the expression? (I suspect 加護 is more formal/written and was carefully chosen by a translator rather than a Japanese preacher talking to his flock.)
Aug
8
comment Which is more natural: イエス様の救う恵み or 救うイエス様の恵み?
Another question raised by the OP presented a similar challenge: japanese.stackexchange.com/questions/14299/how-accurately-can-使い-be-trans‌​lated-as-angel The translators appear to look for words that will capture the correct meaning rather than literally translate - possibly the expression is deliberately borrowed from bhudism because it will be recognised. (I am sure I have read about similar practices carried out by early missionaries in Japan).
Aug
8
comment Which is more natural: イエス様の救う恵み or 救うイエス様の恵み?
(I think I now understand your comment): In western/christian country an expression like this will be readily accepted, even by non-chistians because it so well know it has become a colloquialism. In a non-christian society (or group of people not familiar with any field under discussion) I think it is best to find out the accepted translation and be ready to provide an explanation: I am not sure many people in western societies really understand "Jesus's saving grace", they let it go without a 2nd thought because they all ready understand enough of what is being said to get by.
Aug
8
comment Which is more natural: イエス様の救う恵み or 救うイエス様の恵み?
I don't understand your comment but "saving grace" is an expression associated with the bible/God/Jesus which has become a colloquialism in secular society for a "redeeming quality" while the individual words, saving and grace have taken on new meanings: Such an expression is not easily translated and, just like in any field, I find it most effective to keep to the accepted expressions to avoid confusion.
Aug
8
comment What does [可愛が]りたい mean and how to use it?
Where did the extra "i" come from at the end of "kawaii"? Perhaps you need to get away from romaji, use kanji hiragana - it is quite easy with a modern keyboard.
Aug
7
comment ~ておく / とく for preparation (Conjugation and nuance)
In your example sentence, wouldn't 今週末 be more natural than 週末に?It feels better with just one に(?)
Aug
6
comment Are 髙 and 高 interchangeable?
It was the symbol for Takashimaya dept store. You still see it around although it is all but eliminated from their website and on their wikipeida page there is a note: 「本来の表記は「髙島屋」です。この記事に付けられた題名は記事名の制約から不正確なものとなっています。」
Aug
4
comment Meaning of 「生きるにしても死ぬにしても」
I can't disagree about the "best English phrase" especially if we want to be close as possible to the original Japanese but, based on your explanation, but if this were for the official English version of this game, then the OP's suggestion seems as natural as anything a native would say(?)
Aug
4
comment Relative clause - noun - copula structure: What does it mean? How can we translate it?
@Hyperworm : Scene setting sounds right. I have added more context to example 1 - it was the closing statement by the narrator in one part of a series, so perhaps it was setting the scene for next episode. In example 2 it seems to be setting the scene for the final sentence given. It is difficult to translate - I am sure there must some subjects/topics omitted because they can be understood from the context.
Aug
3
comment Relative clause - noun - copula structure: What does it mean? How can we translate it?
Brandon, @Yang Muye Thank you. I think this is common expression too. Those are interesting suggestions - have you seen such translations in practice or heard an explanation for what effect this construction has?
Aug
3
comment Telling the speaker apart from the person being spoken about
Thank you but for (2) what does the comma add? Is it just a pause for effect?