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Apr
6
comment What does だ mean at the end of a sentence or following a noun
Not sure what you mean by regular or minor sentences. (BTW, you also see it in novels.) I wish I could explain better myself but there is a bit more to it than omitting/bending "regular" grammar rules otherwise guides such as Tae Kim would say that. The best I can manage is the explanation in the answer to the previous question and to fully address is probably beyond the scope of the this OP, but nevertheless it worth mentioning for future reference.
Apr
6
comment How should I choose between [知]{し}る and わかる?
I follow your logic but when you say "parsing" do you mean "have already parsed"? 分かっている is normally static ("subject change") but translating it as "I'm parsing it out already!" does not sound very natural in English and for anybody trying to grasp ~ている is quite confusing.
Apr
6
comment What does だ mean at the end of a sentence or following a noun
I don't want to be too picky but while I think it is fair to say the だ makes it clear that you have completed your statement, if you drop it and the written sentence ends in 。then it is still clear the sentence is finished. In spoken language it depends on context, as shown in your link.
Apr
6
comment What does だ mean at the end of a sentence or following a noun
@Szynmon: You've over generalized in the last paragraph. Just saying that the sentence is not proper without a predicate works in the early stages of study but can cause problems later. The following question usefully explains why if だ is dropped a sentence is not necessarily ungrammatical (Newspapers do it all the time): japanese.stackexchange.com/questions/14178/…です-a‌​t-the-end-of-a-sentence-make-almost-everythingdep
Apr
5
comment kanji 有る, usage in the negative be verb
I am not familiar with those phrases but if that is how they are normally written then I would say those 漢字 are used not just for idiomatic or customary reason but because of their semantic value. Their use is consistent with the use/non-use of 置 and 事 in Tsuyoshi Ito's answer and, to take another example, the use of 越、こと and ない in the set phrase 〜に越したことはない as it is usually written.
Apr
5
comment kanji 有る, usage in the negative be verb
@Snailboat understood me correctly (thank you for expanding my question). I read all posts with the presumption they seek to be constructive. I have not cast my vote but even with an explanation it is hard to improve on the Jan 13 answer, which I had not seen before.
Apr
5
comment What is a good idiom for 'not being invested'?
It sounds like you want to know a more colloquial way of saying 「結果はどうあれ、私には関係ない」but please could make it clear what you want to know? For example you could say "I am not interested in that debate" or "I have no interest (or stake) in that debate" but the two sentences mean completely different things and you cannot substitute "interest(ed)" with "invest(ed)".
Apr
4
revised Ellipsis: does this と=として, what is the relevant verb in this extract?
minor edits
Apr
4
revised Ellipsis: does this と=として, what is the relevant verb in this extract?
minor edits to title
Apr
4
comment Ellipsis: does this と=として, what is the relevant verb in this extract?
Technical Reference: This is covered in Makino's Dictionary of Intermediate Japanese Grammar on pg 464-469. It explains that for this construction, there is usually an elipsis of いって・思って or in this case 呼ばれ because it is passive. The verb should pyschological (面白がる)and the construction is used to refer to psychological state of a 3P (the locals) not the speaker.
Apr
4
accepted Use of が vs を with transitive verb, 受け入れる(+もらえる)
Apr
4
comment kanji 有る, usage in the negative be verb
Why? There was a discussion this week on how learners over use kanji - this being a good example.
Apr
4
revised Explain how 向{む}く “to face” can take “上{うえ}” as a direct object using を?
minor edits
Apr
4
revised Explain how 向{む}く “to face” can take “上{うえ}” as a direct object using を?
minor edits
Apr
4
comment Cartel, syndicate, anti-competitive practice
The other word that occurs to me is 談合 but if I was you I would look for pamphlet put out in both languages. When you talk to Japanese people you both know what you are talking about. (Actually when I first read your question I was reminded of practice I heard about in HK where Swires group companies compete with Jardine Matheson. If you are looking to hire say a conference room then the Swires people will be less helpful if they know you often use JM companies (and vice versa)).
Apr
4
answered Explain how 向{む}く “to face” can take “上{うえ}” as a direct object using を?
Apr
3
comment Explain how 向{む}く “to face” can take “上{うえ}” as a direct object using を?
We see it quite often on this site but, when an intransitive verb takes を it is still intransitve and it is not correct to start referring to the verb as "transitive". Another question on this use of を: japanese.stackexchange.com/questions/14985/…
Apr
3
revised Cartel, syndicate, anti-competitive practice
added link
Apr
3
revised Cartel, syndicate, anti-competitive practice
minor edit
Apr
3
comment Repetitive words (e.g. どんどん, ぺらぺら, いらいら…)
@Kaji: If you need to learn some, there several decks on the anki-shared deck website: ankiweb.net/shared/decks/japanese