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Mar
21
comment When grandmas tell their kids お天道様がみてるよ, how do the kids know who お天道様 is?
(contd) But what is interesting to me is that until they all gradually came together, for a long time I just did not worry about these things, probably because they had no bearing on my day-to-day life. This is just an example but it is an illustration of how words/concepts like 天道様 would be acquired fairly passively. I can remember other instances of words which I often heard but did not start using until one day I asked about them/something happend to make them relevant.
Mar
21
comment When grandmas tell their kids お天道様がみてるよ, how do the kids know who お天道様 is?
This question seems to apply to all languages not just Japanese and "god" is quite a good analogy: I still remember slight confusion when I started school and listened to stories in morning assembly about people who were helped by someone who knows us. This was despite knowing the Christmas story, being taken to church for a brief period and being taught the sign of the cross by my mother. Eventually all these things came together, although I did make sense of the sign of the cross until it was used every morning at my next school 2 years later. (contd)
Mar
21
comment On the replacing of kanji made obsolete in the 1946 reforms with similar-looking kanji.
Apologies if I have missed something obvious but why doesn't this list contain 仏 <-> 沸 (ふつ)or 学 <-> 學 (がく)?
Mar
21
comment What are the reasons for the huge amount of loanwords in Japanese?
Are you sure that English has had a huge linguistic influence on Japan in particular ie, more so than other non-European countries (where the language has non-European roots)?
Mar
20
revised 心配なく surely it should be 心配ない?
small addition to point 2
Mar
20
revised 心配なく surely it should be 心配ない?
minor edits to revised final para
Mar
20
answered 心配なく surely it should be 心配ない?
Mar
19
revised Modifying adjectives: カンペキ [に or な?] 思ったとおりの仕上がり
minor modification title to make it explanatory (no info lost)
Mar
19
comment What´s the (entire) direct object in this sentence?
I am interested you found 指にとげを刺した in the dictionary: You can also say 指にとげが刺さった. My dictionary gives this as "A thorn stuck in my finger." but I think people might use intransitive as an equivalent of "I pricked my finger on a thorn." (possibly more a question for native speaker??)
Mar
18
comment What does 私たち imply?
Maybe you should extend the question to ask, is there a difference between "we" and 私たち? (I don't think there is, not in its practical use at least.)
Mar
17
comment Is それが人生{じんせい} , 仕様{しよう}が無{な}い, or something else the most natural equivalent to “that's life”, “c'est la vie”, etc?
Maybe you should use: 世の中はそんなもんだ ("That is the way of the world.") ?
Mar
17
revised Unusual usage of 勝 (勝たしてくれ?)
make title self explanatory
Mar
17
revised How else can you use 「だい」as in 大好き or 大嫌い?
Addition to title for future reference
Mar
16
revised 知る vs わかる and when to use が and を in “how to” questions
add 知る vs わかる to title for future reference
Mar
16
revised What does ぶつまね (ぶつ真似?) mean?
add missing phrase as per comments
Mar
14
comment 知る vs わかる and when to use が and を in “how to” questions
@MorningCoffee: Can you clarify your question? Is it about the particles (covered by alexhatesmill) or the difference between 知る&わかる(covered in previous question), or something not covered at all?
Mar
13
comment How to say “Episode 22”, “Chapter 22”, “Act 22”, etc?
ie the first act of a play = 劇の第1幕 (which is logical as the curtain often comes down at the end of an act to change the scenery). Seems that 段 can also be used for scene (which is logical as an act is split up into sections)
Mar
13
revised とまる / とめる and such pairs of verbs
minor addition (1st line)
Mar
13
comment Confusion about 一千億 and 一千兆
BTW: I am always surprised how many text books fail to point out that where as larger English counters are in multiples of 3 zeros (ie 1 million = 1000 thousand), the large Japanese counters are in multiples of 4 zeros ("1万万"=1,0000,0000=1億;"1万億"=1,0000,0000,0000= 1兆). It makes them so much easier to remember.
Mar
13
comment Confusion about 一千億 and 一千兆
@Tokyo Nagoya and Earthliŋ: There are a number of mathematical expressions with slightly different meanings. I think you want to say either: "10,000,000" is a whole number without units such as (the currency unit)yen or minutes. However if the same principle also applies to decimals such as "10,000,000.5" (or π (3.14...)) then I think you want to say it is a pure number without units.