7,308 reputation
2730
bio website
location
age
visits member for 2 years, 3 months
seen Oct 21 at 22:29

Apr
15
comment Why 罪人=犯罪者のこと、not just 犯罪者?
Thank you. (Possibly I should have left out the example which I only included it to show the complete context in which this expression is used) My question is based on the logic that: 犯罪者= a person such as a 罪人. 犯罪者のこと= something relating to the 犯罪者, possibly 罪人のこと,but not 罪人. Why/what is koto doing here? The sentences seems to meant The guilty person is the guilty action? (Actually I appreciate it is bit more subtle than that but I can't work it out for myself and hence my question here.)
Apr
15
comment Why 罪人=犯罪者のこと、not just 犯罪者?
@Earthliŋ: That is kind of how I took it but why use it for 罪人 and not 真犯人? Is there a difference?
Apr
15
comment Why 罪人=犯罪者のこと、not just 犯罪者?
@Hanne: 犯罪者= a person such as a 罪人. 犯罪者のこと= something relating to the 犯罪者, possibly 罪人のこと,but not 罪人. (I understand the 例, I have just included it to show the complete context in which this expression is used.)
Apr
15
comment Why 罪人=犯罪者のこと、not just 犯罪者?
@ssb: The question was in the title but I have repeated it now in the text.
Apr
15
revised Why 罪人=犯罪者のこと、not just 犯罪者?
added info in title to text of question
Apr
15
comment What to say at the cash register in the convenience store
Most starter text books have a chapter on buying groceries in a shop and will cover the basic things you want to say. (Nothing you describe is unusual. Any real conversation with the shopkeeper depends on the shopper and the keeper as individuals but apart from the ritual いらっしゃいませs silence is not unusual.)
Apr
15
asked What is でれでれ (spoony)?
Apr
15
asked Why 罪人=犯罪者のこと、not just 犯罪者?
Apr
13
comment Differences in usage between する and やる
Very helpful. Maybe we could add that する has an additional uses for expressions such as wear/sense/cost that do not apply to やる?:eg 1)ネッくレスをする 2)においがする 3)家賃が10万円もする
Apr
12
comment How are Japanese company division, section or department names translated?
Correct in my experience
Apr
11
comment How would one say A implies B in Japanese?
Chocolate: Tx, I misunderstood your comment above. BTW: 称号って違いますね
Apr
11
answered How would one say A implies B in Japanese?
Apr
9
comment Is there a Japanese word for “area with a collection of izakaya stalls or booths”?
street vendors are 屋台 (やたい)、in a matsuri i think they can be called 屋台店 so if you still can't use 商店街, then 屋台店街 or 屋台の商店街/市場 might work?Once upon a time, after the war, 闇市場 might have been appropriate. There is the remnants of one in Shimokitazawa in Tokyo, which got its name from the original blackmarket (戦後の闇市の名残りの場所): mikkagashi.cocolog-nifty.com/blog/2009/05/post-bb1f.html
Apr
9
comment How do you say “funny”?
Here is another example from a recent question where 面白い (面白がる) was used to describe a comedian as funny: http://japanese.stackexchange.com/questions/14999/ellipsis-does-this-と=として-what‌​-is-the-relevant-verb-in-this-extract
Apr
8
comment What does the sentence ending particle や mean?
@TokyoNagoya: Understood. Thank you.
Apr
7
comment What does the sentence ending particle や mean?
@Tokyo Nagoya: For the first や are you saying all three apply in this case? Also is this used in Kanto?
Apr
7
comment Difference between 学習する and 習う?
Hopefully it is a place where anybody with a genuine interest in the language of any level (as long as they at least showing some effort to learn) can participate but the site will only be as good as its participants. There is a bit of peer pressure to keep up the standard (have a look at some the freq questions) but it is meant with the best of intentions. There are also pages that explain better than I can: japanese.stackexchange.com/help/how-to-answer
Apr
7
comment Difference between 学習する and 習う?
Yes, I gave you an upvote because I liked the way you pull up "real life" examples from books but people are less generous these days and one vote can give more "credibility" than in the past. This is just my suggestion but if you over generalise or give your opinion based on experience as a definite rule, without qualification, people who know better are less likely to be generous.
Apr
7
answered Which is a Better Introduction?
Apr
6
comment Meaning of ぬ added to 連用形 / masu-stem, as in 風立ちぬ
You have a detailed explanations below but perhaps one of most famous uses of this form is in the title to the film "Gone with the wind": 「風と共に去りぬ」