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Jul
26
comment Problem understanding 今度一度
@Choko: Me too but without more context I could not be as certain as you can.
Jul
26
comment Problem understanding 今度一度
Thanks. I can't help thinking this is the real test of understanding.
Jul
26
comment How do ことになる and ようになる differ? (When ことになる cannot = “It has been decided that”)
Another question on topic of translating/meaning of ことになる: japanese.stackexchange.com/questions/15623/translation-of-することになっている
Jul
26
comment How do ことになる and ようになる differ? (When ことになる cannot = “It has been decided that”)
I made your title a little more explanatory for future reference. I hope you don't mind.
Jul
26
revised How do ことになる and ようになる differ? (When ことになる cannot = “It has been decided that”)
edited title
Jul
26
comment Problem understanding 今度一度
It would be helpful if you could give everyday English equivalents under your literal translations. (And if that is not straight forward, say so - in this case we might need a bit more context from the OP.)
Jul
25
comment 明日が/明日は, what's the difference?
And how would you ask in Japanese, いつが火曜日ですか or ...?
Jul
25
comment What is the て-form of みます?
This question appears to be off-topic because it is very basic and does not warrant becoming a question. It detracts from the overall quality of the forum.
Jul
24
comment A sentence which I can't make sense of
(1) Can you indicate where this sentence is? (2) From your knowledge, what do you expect it to say?
Jul
23
comment な, の, である and ために
If you go by the standard textbooks or Makino then な sounds wrong and ~であるため is grammatically the same as ~行くため. If you look at it as a linguist and cases where な can replace である and the different uses of の then it may not be so clear cut but I don't have a reference to cite and have not really tried to work it (yet).
Jul
23
comment な, の, である and ために
Good question but I think (?!) that your "rephrased" sentence 2 is degraded if である is replaced with な. This contrasts with having の (original sentence 2 ), which is a perfect sentence because it can be analyzed as NP+the zero form copula+の. This would not be the case if the NP was 形容動詞.(NP=noun phrase)
Jul
19
comment When should I use で or を particles?
@snailboat . Yes, good point. I suppose the sky is similar to the park. Until now I would have thought it was similar to a river which you can swim in (で)or swim across (を). Even so I think will continue using を with park because で just adds to the noise in my spoken Japanese - people will assume I don't understand, even though I may be deliberately using something that is technically correct.
Jul
18
comment When should I use で or を particles?
@snailboat: That's interesting. Does Martin give other examples? (Can't help wondering if he just made it up to fit this one case!) I had exact same question as the OP. I was told that even though で is grammatically possible, people use を when they take a walk in the park. As a rule of thumb, I think we non-natives should try to follow the conventions, without overly worrying about it them, in much the same way non-native speakers of English get by.
Jul
15
comment “は + verb” instead of “を + verb”?
は is often a topic marker not a subject marker, that is が.
Jul
15
comment Meaning of 虚ろに in this particular case
I have never heard anybody referred to as "becoming not fully conscious again" in the "real English speaking world". It seems derivative a typical J->E dictionary. You also have not mentioned how to deal with ~てしまいました which is a challenge when it is combined with an English expression such as "not fully conscious". Possibly "~I slipped into a stupor (or daze)" might work? We could add "complete" before stupor/daze but the sentence is more natural without it and a "slip" is often an action that takes one beyond the point of no return which (I think) captures the 〜てしまいました nuance.
Jul
15
revised Valid interpretations of the (first) て-form in 何かを犠牲にして、その上で、平和は成り立っている。
added 53 characters in body
Jul
15
comment Valid interpretations of the (first) て-form in 何かを犠牲にして、その上で、平和は成り立っている。
"Cause and effect" is used to indicate a reason or causal link between the two actions. "Sequential actions" is used to indicate cases where the te-form simply describes the order in which the actions occur. We can quibble but it is more important to focus on the nature of the examples than the English labels (which I have not made up myself)
Jul
15
revised Valid interpretations of the (first) て-form in 何かを犠牲にして、その上で、平和は成り立っている。
added 585 characters in body
Jul
15
revised Can you say “よい夢へ” instead of “よい夢を”?
deleted 45 characters in body
Jul
15
revised Can you say “よい夢へ” instead of “よい夢を”?
deleted 4 characters in body