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Feb
4
asked 夏名漱石‘s use of question marker かい for an open instead of closed (ie yes/no) question
Feb
3
asked 明日: あす & あした; Is there a difference in meaning and when each is used?
Feb
1
comment Function of に in this passive construction
Can I add a bonus question?: Is it possible to understand the function of も in this sentence? (emphasis or "also", but we do not have context to know what the ”also-も” is referring to?
Feb
1
comment The differences between 真理,真相 and 真実
@TN-san: your humour will help me remember this. Thanks.
Jan
31
comment Doubt about ことにする and. ことにした
Consider the context、when would you say "I will decide to go to Japan" or "I decide to go to Japan"? Possibly if you wanted to say "Before I decide to go Japan I shall....." (私は日本へ行くことにする前....)? or perhaps if you were to predict "In two years time, my son will decide to go to Japan "? (2年後、うちの息子は日本へ行くことにすると思います?)
Jan
30
comment When can “~たがる” not be used in a continuous tense?
~行きたがりそう (along with other verbs) is one example of ~たがるis not used in the continuous tense that I have come across.
Jan
30
comment Kanji question: the onyomi of 江 is found
Apart from place names which mainly seem to be in China and Korea (so possibly the Japanese use follows the local use of 江?) it does not seen very common does it? My J->E dictionary, which would be less likely to have obscure words has none. My old 電子辞書 which I still use to find words/readings that use a particular 2nd kanji has only 10 uses of the 江, of which only one 遡江 (そこう)fits. It seems to refer to a river going over/up slope and even that seems to be somewhat specific to the Yangtze River (長江).
Jan
29
accepted 「こんな夢を見た。」- why not この?
Jan
29
comment 「こんな夢を見た。」- why not この?
2. I was initially not quite sure why you say Japanese speakers will reply 「どの夢」but not 「どんな夢」. However my text book (完全マスターN3文法)tells me that whereas この is used to define limit or specify, こんな is used to refer to a state or condition. -> This is consistent with your explanation because we cannot define something AND mention it for the first time in the same sentence (QED). [Not sure if this comment is helpful for others but I will leave it for anybody trying to use the same textbook.]
Jan
29
comment 「こんな夢を見た。」- why not この?
1. (Thank you) That makes sense and it probably solves other occasions I have struggled to understand why こんな is used but Interestingly in English I prefer the existing translation: I can imagine some people saying "it went like this" but it has a colloquial feel to it.
Jan
29
comment 「こんな夢を見た。」- why not この?
@TokyoNagoya: It is corrected now. Thank you.
Jan
29
revised 「こんな夢を見た。」- why not この?
edited body
Jan
29
asked 「こんな夢を見た。」- why not この?
Jan
29
comment Where does だって come from?
@Anthony: I have to admit, I'd never heard of とて but thanks to Chocolate and Shun I can see it exists in my dictionary but I am still not sure understand this particle. Perhaps you should revise your question to ask about the use of とて as in だとてー>だって, where it comes from and how it works? I've never seen it mentioned in a text book or class.
Jan
26
comment What is the difference between 乗り場 and バス停?
@silvermaple: I think the Japanese ホム only applies to trains but in English, a platform was originally just "a raised level surface on which people or things can stand", often to catch trains or allow others to see a performance / speaker.
Jan
25
comment What is the difference between 乗り場 and バス停?
Why are both the above answers being voted down? Both seem to be from users who have taken the time to provide perfectly correct straight forward answers for a straight forward question. (Troll best ignored?)
Jan
24
comment Difference between intransitive and passive?
@virmaior: My English dictionary says it is an adjective but we already know, English and Japanese translations do not always correlate....
Jan
24
comment Difference between intransitive and passive?
@Istrasci: ha ha, I've learnt to try use English people will understand without being distracted by the words themselves but I do wonder, what was the etymology of one the first Japanese expressions I learnt here, コんピュターがダウンしています。
Jan
24
accepted The use of ~た、~ている、~ていた to refer to a resultant state (new question)
Jan
24
comment Difference between intransitive and passive?
"Broke down", might be more commonly used with cars elsewhere (unless you are thinking of a "car break-down service"?) but, in the UK, it is also used with the TVs, printers, boilers, washing machines and other complicated machines we don't understand but rely on to work. Off the top my head, I cannot think of a better expression for a TV thats broken down (!) - "The telly's on the blink again" comes to mind but that is a bit colloquial.