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Feb
19
comment A Very Painful Situation
I think you mean to ask "is the すぎ correctly translated as "a bit after", not "before": すぎ comes from the verb 過ぎる which means exceed or pass. In this case it just means after but you could infer "a bit". It depends on the context.
Feb
19
accepted Is this って equivalent to 「と」?
Feb
18
comment Is this って equivalent to 「と」?
@TokyoNagoya: It seems I accepted the answer (0522 on 23Aug) before the correspondence and answers were finished. I appreciate you pointing this out (and will have to review again)but as Cypher was upvoted (and Earthling and I downvoted) have to take it you think that one is correct.
Feb
18
comment Attributive form in Japanese narration
Also, not sure your giving us enough information in your quotes for anyone to judge. Somebody might explain the principle of how plain form is used for background/context but I am not sure your extracts will be enough.
Feb
18
comment Attributive form in Japanese narration
Can you give us your reference? The only explanation I have of how dictionary form is used in the past context in novels is in the Dictionary of Intermediate Jpse Grammar but as I recall (and do not have it to hand) this only indicates that it is used for context/background, using an extract from Kawabata (The Sound of the Mountain (山の音)).
Feb
18
revised Difference between 方法 and 手段
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Feb
18
revised Difference between 方法 and 手段
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Feb
18
comment Attributive form in Japanese narration
I think you get some of the answer in the answer to this question, which I would summarise as you could use 〜ている but it sounds colloquial: japanese.stackexchange.com/questions/14272/the-use-of-~た、~ている、~ていた-to-ref‌​er-to-a-resultant-state-new-question
Feb
18
answered Difference between 方法 and 手段
Feb
16
comment なってきています and なっています
If you want to convey something is "in progress", or in the "continuative state" with a verb like なっている then context is all important: Not entirely sure about your example but I would say やばくなっている implies they are in trouble, ヤバくなってきている indicates they were not in trouble before but they have got into and are still in trouble (which is only a small difference). ている and てくる are separate subjects. Have a look at the answers other questions on these areas and this website, recently recommended by Snailplan: homepage3.nifty.com/park/aspect.htm
Feb
15
answered なってきています and なっています
Feb
15
revised Is 年寄り “neutral” or “positive”?
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Feb
15
revised Using negative verb forms with はず
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Feb
15
revised Using negative verb forms with はず
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Feb
15
answered Using negative verb forms with はず
Feb
15
revised Is 年寄り “neutral” or “positive”?
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Feb
15
answered Is 年寄り “neutral” or “positive”?
Feb
14
comment Are there rules over using 公認/alternative words to translate the names of professional qualifications using “Certified” in English?
(Thanks - Actually this was one my references.)
Feb
13
revised Are there rules over using 公認/alternative words to translate the names of professional qualifications using “Certified” in English?
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Feb
13
revised Are there rules over using 公認/alternative words to translate the names of professional qualifications using “Certified” in English?
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