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8h
comment Which is more colloquial for “I have a headache”?
@Szymon: Hi. I was taught that saying 頭が痛い sounds strange. If you explain to someone that you have a headache then, unless you are Dr Spock, the natural expression is 頭が痛いの(です)because that is how you explain (ie ~のです)and a full explanation needs to convey the pain to get taken seriously(?)
8h
comment The meaning of 権利を掛ける
I agree with Earthliŋ because the meaning is somewhat similar to 命を懸ける.
8h
comment Particle に used with ~て頂いてありがとう
Explaining the context makes it much clearer: "(I'm glad that)" is not included in your revised sentence (お父さん〜いただいた)although it might be inferred. (You've also turned the viewpoint of the sentence around from the literal "I received" to Your father gave me" but I think you understand that.) If the speaker forcefully took the energy from the listener then I would say there is a sense of irony in what he actually says ("Thank you for for giving me..."). The sentence is grammatically correct and is not casual (eg いただく is not casual) but it is spoken & the words are chosen to fit the context.
9h
revised Particle に used with ~て頂いてありがとう
added 4 characters in body
11h
answered Particle に used with ~て頂いてありがとう
17h
accepted What is でれでれ (spoony)?
23h
comment Why 罪人=犯罪者のこと、not just 犯罪者?
Hmm. I still can't explain it. For example, 罪人:犯罪者= The guilty party: The criminal (or the person that committed the crime). Guilty: Responsible for the crime, "What the criminal is" (= 犯罪者のこと?)The nominalizer koto seems to fit with 罪 but not 罪人.
1d
revised What is でれでれ (spoony)?
deleted 2 characters in body
1d
comment What is でれでれ (spoony)?
@kaji: Tx. So per your link, spoony and hence でれでれ is to be "enamored in a silly or sentimental way."(?)...IOW my original guess is correct?
1d
comment Why 罪人=犯罪者のこと、not just 犯罪者?
Thank you. (Possibly I should have left out the example which I only included it to show the complete context in which this expression is used) My question is based on the logic that: 犯罪者= a person such as a 罪人. 犯罪者のこと= something relating to the 犯罪者, possibly 罪人のこと,but not 罪人. Why/what is koto doing here? The sentences seems to meant The guilty person is the guilty action? (Actually I appreciate it is bit more subtle than that but I can't work it out for myself and hence my question here.)
1d
comment Why 罪人=犯罪者のこと、not just 犯罪者?
@Earthliŋ: That is kind of how I took it but why use it for 罪人 and not 真犯人? Is there a difference?
1d
comment Why 罪人=犯罪者のこと、not just 犯罪者?
@Hanne: 犯罪者= a person such as a 罪人. 犯罪者のこと= something relating to the 犯罪者, possibly 罪人のこと,but not 罪人. (I understand the 例, I have just included it to show the complete context in which this expression is used.)
1d
comment Why 罪人=犯罪者のこと、not just 犯罪者?
@ssb: The question was in the title but I have repeated it now in the text.
1d
revised Why 罪人=犯罪者のこと、not just 犯罪者?
added info in title to text of question
1d
comment What to say at the cash register in the convenience store
Most starter text books have a chapter on buying groceries in a shop and will cover the basic things you want to say. (Nothing you describe is unusual. Any real conversation with the shopkeeper depends on the shopper and the keeper as individuals but apart from the ritual いらっしゃいませs silence is not unusual.)
1d
asked What is でれでれ (spoony)?
1d
asked Why 罪人=犯罪者のこと、not just 犯罪者?
2d
comment ふるさと (home town, birthplace) uses which kanji - 古里 or 故郷?
ありがとう、大変勉強になりました。
Apr
13
comment Differences in usage between する and やる
Very helpful. Maybe we could add that する has an additional uses for expressions such as wear/sense/cost that do not apply to やる?:eg 1)ネッくレスをする 2)においがする 3)家賃が10万円もする
Apr
12
comment How are Japanese company division, section or department names translated?
Correct in my experience