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seen Feb 6 at 17:55

Oct
20
comment Positioning of quantities (using counters)
@Tim: yes, it's definitely grammatically acceptable. I've gone through quite a few real texts trying to find some difference to put my finger on, and was surprised to realize that's actually a lot more common than I had assumed.
Oct
20
comment Positioning of quantities (using counters)
@Troyen: Thanks. I'm glad to see people still remember me. :)
Jul
7
comment How to translate “edge” into Japanese
@language hacker: There's a another very good reason no one has mentioned for why questions should be focused and readily answerable. Since this site is still in beta, it is tested for effectiveness, and one of the parameters (as you can see in the Area 51 page) is the percentage of unanswered questions. I think we all want this site to succeed, and the users here go out of their way to provide useful answers, but it is hard to answer an unfocused question, and this reflect badly on the site.
Jul
2
comment What are the meanings of ~とも [tomo] and ~かしら [kashira]?
@Dainel: There are still people saying "Thou" today. Archaisms still survive, but their use becomes more and more artificial. You can definitely hear ~とも in extremely formal speech or in historical dramas. But other than that - no. It may still be common in some dialects but as far as I know it's strictly archaic in everyday speech.
Jul
2
comment Is there a study available on the similarities between Japanese and Turkish grammars?
@Amanda: Could be, but that question would remain open until someone who happens to speak both Japanese and Turkish would get here. And than their personal impression is not too different than my professor's impression, I guess, unless they can provide some examples. This is probably what hippietrail was looking for, but I'm afraid it would have to wait for linguistics.stackexchange.com or at least until this site grows bigger and gets some Turkish speakers (and I'm sure it eventually will).
Jun
27
comment Are there cases when two or more particles will occur next to each other without intervening lexical words?
@hippietrail: including the interjection particles ね and さ? If we put ね aside... Well you do have わよ, and の is commonly used before the particles with a meaning of question or uncertainty: か、かな and かしら. And かな itself is essentially a combination of two sentence-final particles: か and な.
Jun
27
comment Why is は pronounced as わ when used as a topic particle?
@Kafka: Yeah, it does explain all the voiced/unvoiced mess in ハ行. :)
Jun
27
comment Using な particle after common nouns (non na-adjectives)
I'm not quite sure how a native speaker gets what they did on Dictionary@goo, but the line between な-adjectives and noun is definitely blurry, so it wouldn't be too surprising.
Jun
26
comment What does “+ra shinai” conjugation mean?
@Lukman: I don't think so. As far as I know, it's just a slightly elided form of は.
Jun
25
comment What's the difference between 迷う and 紕う?
@Dave: (somewhat meta) shouldn't your comments be made to an answer. We should leave as few unanswered questions as possible, and this seems to me to be a real answer (紕う is just an older/uncommon reading). I've seen it with other questions here too, that sometime remain unanswered although they are really answered in the comments.
Jun
25
comment Is Japanese really an agglutinative language?
@hippietrail: I mostly judge on what I know. The only agglutinative languages I know to a satisfying degree (to make some assumptions about them) are Japanese, Korean, Swahili and Quechua (and I know Japanese far better than the other three :)). It might make a my view a bit biased, but that would be true for just about anyone. Anyway, linguists usually tend to have many different opinions on the same subject, though when you inspect things closely, you'll often find the difference is not so huge.
Jun
25
comment Is Japanese really an agglutinative language?
And more about case: one of the most confusing things here is that some generative linguists use "case" an entirely different (and separate) sense from "morphological case". I'm not strong on generative linguistics (frankly, it kinda bores the heck out of me :)), but from what I understand those cases really refer to the syntactical role of a noun phrase (NP in generative lingo) in the sentence. This is similar to what a morphological case usually does, but for the generative syntacticians they exist in every language - they are just marked differently.
Jun
25
comment Is Japanese really an agglutinative language?
As for standard order - I more or less meant what you've meant as rigid order. But being "rigid" is really relative. You're definitely going to find different orders in different dialects, and you might find a few exceptions in any agglutinative languages (since, as I've said, there are no pure languages). I think these views are rather accepted, but Wikipedia is often bad at laying out these things.
Jun
25
comment Is Japanese really an agglutinative language?
@hippietrail: It's often said about Hungarian, but Hungarian grammatical tradition was probably highly influenced by Latin. The fact is that adjectives in Hungarian don't agree by case, while Finnish adjectives do. The Hungarian adjectives may have done the same thing in the past (since both languages are part of the same Finno-Ugric family), but I don't know enough about these languages to tell.
Jun
25
comment Is Japanese really an agglutinative language?
@hippietrail: nouns in Japanese are not internally inflected, but they are agglutinated. -no, -mo, -de, -ni even the copula are all really just suffixes, and they form a single unit with the nouns they follow. The only difference between nouns and verbs is that nouns have just a single base to which all these suffixes attach, while verbs have several different bases (such as Mizenkei, Rentaikei, etc.)
Jun
24
comment How can I say “some X ” in Japanese?
please try to format your question properly. Shorthand speak and cap-less English is OK for comments, but the questions are better to be readable if you want people to answer them. It doesn't take a lot of effort to hit the shift key a few times, and you'll save the nice people here helping you a lot of eyeaches. :)
Jun
22
comment How did 革 “leather” come to mean newness?
Mine is the 6th edition, which is the newest I as far as I know. It's also the electronic edition (I'm totally useless with paper dictionaries, especially in Japanese :(), so maybe that counts. This definition is taken from the kanji definitions section and not from the word definitions section, if that helps.
Jun
22
comment How did 革 “leather” come to mean newness?
No hypothesis, it can be found in just about any Kanji dictionary. I'll link some. And I think I've actually first heard it in one of my classes, from a professor who's a Classical Chinese expert.
Jun
22
comment Origin/etymology of こころ~ words
@Tsuyoshi: he's referring to the fact they have a different base kanji than 心.
Jun
22
comment What's the difference between ~てください and ~ていてください?
In the end maybe it's best to say that using just 見守って doesn't necessarily imply that the action is not durative. It just doesn't put a focus on the durativity of the action.