7,891 reputation
2442
bio website
location
age
visits member for 3 years, 6 months
seen May 11 at 12:44

Jun
24
revised Can I help you?
deleted 2 characters in body
Jun
24
comment How can I say “some X ” in Japanese?
please try to format your question properly. Shorthand speak and cap-less English is OK for comments, but the questions are better to be readable if you want people to answer them. It doesn't take a lot of effort to hit the shift key a few times, and you'll save the nice people here helping you a lot of eyeaches. :)
Jun
24
revised How can I say “some X ” in Japanese?
added 7 characters in body; edited title
Jun
24
awarded  Nice Answer
Jun
24
awarded  Enlightened
Jun
24
awarded  Nice Answer
Jun
23
reviewed Approve Difference between にかんして and について?
Jun
23
answered Why the “H” is pronounced as “Sh” in some cases?
Jun
23
awarded  Enlightened
Jun
23
awarded  Nice Answer
Jun
22
awarded  Suffrage
Jun
22
revised How did 革 “leather” come to mean newness?
added 112 characters in body
Jun
22
comment How did 革 “leather” come to mean newness?
Mine is the 6th edition, which is the newest I as far as I know. It's also the electronic edition (I'm totally useless with paper dictionaries, especially in Japanese :(), so maybe that counts. This definition is taken from the kanji definitions section and not from the word definitions section, if that helps.
Jun
22
revised How did 革 “leather” come to mean newness?
added 139 characters in body; added 1 characters in body
Jun
22
comment How did 革 “leather” come to mean newness?
No hypothesis, it can be found in just about any Kanji dictionary. I'll link some. And I think I've actually first heard it in one of my classes, from a professor who's a Classical Chinese expert.
Jun
22
answered How did 革 “leather” come to mean newness?
Jun
22
answered Origin/etymology of こころ~ words
Jun
22
comment Origin/etymology of こころ~ words
@Tsuyoshi: he's referring to the fact they have a different base kanji than 心.
Jun
22
comment What's the difference between ~てください and ~ていてください?
In the end maybe it's best to say that using just 見守って doesn't necessarily imply that the action is not durative. It just doesn't put a focus on the durativity of the action.
Jun
22
comment What's the difference between ~てください and ~ていてください?
@Derek: there's something called "lexical aspect" or "Aktionsart" which refers to aspectual information (such as durativity of action) which is already embedded inside the word itself (even without conjugation). Technically speaking, you can say that English verbs like "continue" or even "walk" refer to an action that is inherently durative - and it's still far from rare to find the verb forms "continuing" or "walking". The same thing can be said about Japanese.