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seen Feb 6 at 17:55

Jun
23
answered Why the “H” is pronounced Sh in some cases.
Jun
23
awarded  Enlightened
Jun
23
awarded  Nice Answer
Jun
22
awarded  Suffrage
Jun
22
revised How did 革 “leather” come to mean newness?
added 112 characters in body
Jun
22
comment How did 革 “leather” come to mean newness?
Mine is the 6th edition, which is the newest I as far as I know. It's also the electronic edition (I'm totally useless with paper dictionaries, especially in Japanese :(), so maybe that counts. This definition is taken from the kanji definitions section and not from the word definitions section, if that helps.
Jun
22
revised How did 革 “leather” come to mean newness?
added 139 characters in body; added 1 characters in body
Jun
22
comment How did 革 “leather” come to mean newness?
No hypothesis, it can be found in just about any Kanji dictionary. I'll link some. And I think I've actually first heard it in one of my classes, from a professor who's a Classical Chinese expert.
Jun
22
answered How did 革 “leather” come to mean newness?
Jun
22
answered Origin/etymology of こころ~ words
Jun
22
comment Origin/etymology of こころ~ words
@Tsuyoshi: he's referring to the fact they have a different base kanji than 心.
Jun
22
comment What's the difference between ~てください and ~ていてください?
In the end maybe it's best to say that using just 見守って doesn't necessarily imply that the action is not durative. It just doesn't put a focus on the durativity of the action.
Jun
22
comment What's the difference between ~てください and ~ていてください?
@Derek: there's something called "lexical aspect" or "Aktionsart" which refers to aspectual information (such as durativity of action) which is already embedded inside the word itself (even without conjugation). Technically speaking, you can say that English verbs like "continue" or even "walk" refer to an action that is inherently durative - and it's still far from rare to find the verb forms "continuing" or "walking". The same thing can be said about Japanese.
Jun
22
comment Is 日語 a good two-kanji stand-in for 日本語 (“Japanese language”)?
@Tsuyoshi: Strange indeed. Maybe they took their Chinese names? (Or at least part of them, because in Chinese a dictionary is usually 词典 and not 辞典.
Jun
22
comment Is 日語 a good two-kanji stand-in for 日本語 (“Japanese language”)?
日語 is definitely Chinese, as is the use of 日 (instead of 和) as an abbreviation for "Japanese". For instance, you'd easily see 日中词典 in Chinese, but in Japanese it would be called (I think, since I never saw one :)): 和漢辞典.
Jun
22
answered What's the difference between ~てください and ~ていてください?
Jun
22
comment Can totemo be used with daisuki or daikirai
I think you're on to it. There's nothing preventing you from saying とても大好き, but it does sounds a bit overboard. Not really childish (I'm sure many if not most of the people you found using it on Google aren't children), but maybe still somewhat like saying "a lot a lot" in English.
Jun
22
revised Can totemo be used with daisuki or daikirai
Fixed formatting
Jun
22
comment Is Japanese particularly good for punning/spoonerisms? If so, why?
@ento: Yeah, even if you know the physics you can probably freak out on a double rainbow! ;)
Jun
22
comment What is the difference between the nominalizers こと and の?
@Derek: You're right, things easily get blurry in grammar. The "reason" version of の, for instance, can be seen and somewhat different than the ordinary nominalizer, and it did eventually get to be something new in the case of ~のだ・~んだ. Originally, it's plausible to assume that「行くのだ」 meant something like "It's the reason that means that I'll go." but now it's rightfully viewed as an entirely different grammatical construct.