7,694 reputation
2039
bio website
location
age
visits member for 2 years, 10 months
seen Feb 6 at 17:55

Jul
4
awarded  Nice Answer
Jul
2
comment What are the meanings of ~とも [tomo] and ~かしら [kashira]?
@Dainel: There are still people saying "Thou" today. Archaisms still survive, but their use becomes more and more artificial. You can definitely hear ~とも in extremely formal speech or in historical dramas. But other than that - no. It may still be common in some dialects but as far as I know it's strictly archaic in everyday speech.
Jul
2
comment Is there a study available on the similarities between Japanese and Turkish grammars?
@Amanda: Could be, but that question would remain open until someone who happens to speak both Japanese and Turkish would get here. And than their personal impression is not too different than my professor's impression, I guess, unless they can provide some examples. This is probably what hippietrail was looking for, but I'm afraid it would have to wait for linguistics.stackexchange.com or at least until this site grows bigger and gets some Turkish speakers (and I'm sure it eventually will).
Jun
28
awarded  Nice Answer
Jun
28
awarded  Convention
Jun
27
answered What are the meanings of ~とも [tomo] and ~かしら [kashira]?
Jun
27
revised honorifics wiki excerpt
deleted 42 characters in body
Jun
27
revised honorifics wiki description
added 469 characters in body
Jun
27
revised phonology wiki description
added 1170 characters in body
Jun
27
revised phonology wiki excerpt
deleted 12 characters in body
Jun
27
revised first-person-pronoun wiki description
added 1101 characters in body
Jun
27
wiki created colloquial description
Jun
27
wiki created colloquial excerpt
Jun
27
awarded  Civic Duty
Jun
27
revised The reason for using 何も+negative, but 何でも+positive
edited tags; edited title
Jun
27
comment Are there cases when two or more particles will occur next to each other without intervening lexical words?
@hippietrail: including the interjection particles ね and さ? If we put ね aside... Well you do have わよ, and の is commonly used before the particles with a meaning of question or uncertainty: か、かな and かしら. And かな itself is essentially a combination of two sentence-final particles: か and な.
Jun
27
comment Why is は pronounced as わ when used as a topic particle?
@Kafka: Yeah, it does explain all the voiced/unvoiced mess in ハ行. :)
Jun
27
answered Is there a study available on the similarities between Japanese and Turkish grammars?
Jun
27
answered Are there cases when two or more particles will occur next to each other without intervening lexical words?
Jun
27
comment Using な particle after common nouns (non na-adjectives)
I'm not quite sure how a native speaker gets what they did on Dictionary@goo, but the line between な-adjectives and noun is definitely blurry, so it wouldn't be too surprising.